To the Last Man

      Zane Grey
To the Last Man

This romance is true to Grey's conception of the Pleasant Valley War and he bases it upon the setting he learned to know and love so well, upon the strange passions of primitive people, and upon his instinctive reaction to the facts and rumors he had gathered.
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    Desert Gold

      Zane Grey
Desert Gold

The story describes the recent uprising along the border, and ends with the finding of the gold which two prospectors had willed to the girl who is the story's heroine.
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    The U. P. Trail

      Zane Grey
The U. P. Trail

Although Western writer Zane Grey is best remembered for The Riders of the Purple Sage, the novel The U.P. Trail is a favorite among critics and fans alike. This ambitious tale weaves a grand narrative of the construction of the Union Pacific Railroad line, which serves as the backdrop for a tender romance that blooms between the virtuous Allie and the mysterious and taciturn protagonist, Warren Neale
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    The Border Legion

      Zane Grey
The Border Legion

Jack Kells was a remorseless killer, head of a gang that ravaged the southern border. He didn't think twice before he kidnapped pretty Joan Randle on a lonesome Idaho trail. His cold eyes filled her with fear, but her goodness made something happen deep within him. Bad as he was, he knew he had to keep Joan safe from desperados far worse than he. Kells had a price on his head and on his heels. Now loving this woman could cost him his life...or it could make him a hero in this wild, dangerous land.
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    The Spirit of the Border: A Romance of the Early Settlers in the Ohio Valley

      Zane Grey
The Spirit of the Border: A Romance of the Early Settlers in the Ohio Valley

Originally published in 1906, The Spirit of the Border is a historical novel written by Zane Grey. The novel is based on events occurring in the Ohio River Valley in the late eighteenth century. It features the exploits of Lewis Wetzel, a historical personage who had dedicated his life to the destruction of Native Americans and to the protection of nascent white settlements in that region. The story deals with the attempt by Moravian Church missionaries to Christianize Indians and how two brothers' lives take different paths upon their arrival on the border. A highly romanticized account, the novel is the second in a trilogy, the first of which is Betty Zane, Grey's first published work, and The Last Trail, which focuses on the life of Jonathan Zane, Grey's ancestor.
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    The Young Forester

      Zane Grey
The Young Forester

I loved outdoor life and hunting. Some way a grizzly bear would come in when I tried to explain forestry to my brother. "Hunting grizzlies!" he cried. "Why, Ken, father says you've been reading dime novels." "Just wait, Hal, till he comes out here. I'll show him that forestry isn't just bear-hunting." My brother Hal and I were camping a few days on the Susquehanna River, and we had divided the time between fishing and tramping. Our camp was on the edge of a forest some eight miles from Harrisburg. The property belonged to our father, and he had promised to drive out to see us. But he did not come that day, and I had to content myself with winning Hal over to my side. "Ken, if the governor lets you go to Arizona can't you ring me in?" "Not this summer. I'd be afraid to ask him. But in another year I'll do it." "Won't it be great? But what a long time to wait! It makes me sick to think of you out there riding mustangs and hunting bears and lions." "You'll have to stand it. You're pretty much of a kid, Hal—not yet fourteen. Besides, I've graduated."
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    Riders of the Purple Sage

      Zane Grey
Riders of the Purple Sage

Riders of the Purple Sage is a Western novel by Zane Grey, first published by Harper & Brothers in 1912. Considered by many critics[who?] to have played a significant role in shaping the formula of the popular Western genre, the novel has been called "the most popular western novel of all time." Riders of the Purple Sage tells the story of Jane Withersteen and her battle to overcome persecution by members of her polygamous Mormon fundamentalist church. A leader of the church, Elder Tull, wants to marry her. Withersteen gets help from a number of friends, including Bern Venters and Lassiter, a famous gunman and killer of Mormons. Throughout most of the novel she struggles with her "blindness" to the evil nature of her church and its leaders, and tries to keep Venters and Lassiter from killing the adversaries who are slowly ruining her. When she adopts a child, Fay, she abandons her beliefs and discovers her true love. A second plot strand tells of Venters and his escape to the wilderness with a girl named Bess, "the rustler's girl," whom he has accidentally shot. Venters falls in love with the girl while caring for her. Together they escape to the East, while Lassiter, Fay, and Jane, pursued by both Mormons and rustlers, escape into a paradise-like valley and topple a giant rock to forever close off the only way in or out. The events depicted in Riders of the Purple Sage occur in mid-spring and late summer 1871. Early in Riders of the Purple Sage, Jane Withersteen's main conflict is her right to befriend a Gentile. (The word Gentile means "non-Mormon" and is used a lot in the book). Jane Withersteen’s father wished Jane to marry Elder Tull, but Jane refused saying she did not love him, causing controversy and leading to persecution by the local Mormons. Jane’s friend, (cowboy) Bern Venters is "arrested" by Tull and his men, but is not clear under what authority. Jane defends Venters, declaring him her best rider. Her churchmen refuse to value the opinion of a woman: "Tull lifted a shaking finger toward her. 'That'll do from you. Understand, you'll not be allowed to hold this boy [Venters] to a friendship that's offensive to your bishop. Jane Withersteen, your father left you wealth and power. It has turned your head. You haven't yet come to see the place of Mormon women ...'" It is here we first hear of Lassiter. Ironically, at the moment when Venters mentions Lassiter’s name, the actual Lassiter is seen approaching in the distance by Tull’s men. Upon his arrival, Lassiter expresses his trust in the word of women, at which Tull rebukes him, telling him not to meddle in Mormon affairs. Tull’s men begin to take Venters away, and Venters realizes who he is and screams "Lassiter!" Tull understands that this is the infamous Lassiter and flees. Lassiter inquires as to the location of Millie Erne's grave, to which a transfixed Jane agrees to take him. Venters later tells Jane he must leave her. When she protests, Venters delivers this statement: " ... Tull is implacable. You ought to see from his intention today that ... but you can't see. Your blindness ... your damned religion! Jane, forgive me ... I'm sore within and something rankles. Well, I fear that invisible hand [of Mormon power in the region] will turn its hidden work to your ruin.", showing that Venters could see far into the future, and although Jane rebukes his statement, he is indeed correct. Jane’s red herd is rustled shortly afterward and Venters tracks it and returns it to Jane. Bern finds the herd, but, in his travels, wages a gun battle with two of Oldring’s rustlers, killing one and managing to wound Oldring’s notorious Masked Rider. Upon further examination, he removes the mask and shirt of the wounded rider and learns that the Masked Rider is a young woman named Bess whom he believes had been abused by Oldring. Venters experiences a large amount of guilt about shooting a girl and decides that it is his duty to save her.
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    Betty Zane

      Zane Grey
Betty Zane

Inspired by the life and adventures of his own great-great grandmother, Betty Zane was Zane Grey's first novel and launched his career as a master writer of rousing frontier and Western adventures. Betty Zane is the story of the events culminating in the last battle of the American Revolution, when two hundred Redcoats from British-controlled Detroit along with four hundred Shawnee Indian attacked the small, wood-palisaded Ford Henry on the western frontier. The heroine of the battle--a young, spunky, and beautiful frontier girl--was Betty Zane
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    The Man of the Forest

      Zane Grey
The Man of the Forest

Milt Dale is the Man of the Forest. Living alone in a camp in the wilderness called Paradise Park, he prefers the company of bears, cougars, and wolves to that of the surrounding ranchers and troublemakers. But one day he overhears a conversation that changes his life and convinces him to leave his wild paradise to save a young woman from certain doom. The pioneer spirit runs in Helen Rayner’s blood, but it may not save her from the nasty end that tough guy Snake Anson has planned for her. To get his hands on her uncle’s ranch, he needs to get rid of Helen—by any means necessary. But luckily for Helen, the Man of the Forest is not about to let that happen.
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    Ken Ward in the Jungle

      Zane Grey
Ken Ward in the Jungle

Ken Ward in the Jungle is a western novel written by Zane Grey. The book tells of the adventures of the title character and his brother as they go canoeing in Mexico. Zane Grey was a prolific American writer of historical and western novels. Grey's books were a big influence on the idealization of the American frontier and his book Riders of the Purple Sage is considered by many to be the greatest western novel ever written.
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    The Light of the Western Stars

      Zane Grey
The Light of the Western Stars

When Madeline Hammond stepped from the train at El Cajon, New Mexico, it was nearly midnight, and her first impression was of a huge dark space of cool, windy emptiness, strange and silent, stretching away under great blinking white stars. Miss, there's no one to meet you, said the conductor, rather anxiously. I wired my brother, she replied. "The train being so late - perhaps he grew tired of waiting. He will be here presently. But, if he should not come - surely I can find a hotel?" There's lodgings to be had. Get the station agent to show you. If you'll excuse me - this is no place for a lady like you to be alone at night. It's a rough little town - mostly Mexicans, miners, cowboys. And they carouse a lot. Besides, the revolution across the border has stirred up some excitement along the line. Miss, I guess it's safe enough, if you -
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    The Last of the Plainsmen

      Zane Grey
The Last of the Plainsmen

Colonel "Buffalo" Jones, the last of the plainsmen, and several associates venture into the region of Buckskin Mountain, along the northern rim of the Grand Canyon. In a continuing quest to establish dominion over wild animals, Jones leads his men on a journey to capture untamed cougars and bring them back alive. After several run-ins with Navajo, Commanche, Yellow Knife and Great Slave Indians, Jones finally captures his first wild cougar. Faithful to the 1911 Second Edition, illustrated with photographs by the author, this is an adventure you won't want to miss. Have a "Look Inside".
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