The Orange Girl

      Walter Besant
The Orange Girl

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    For Faith and Freedom

      Walter Besant
For Faith and Freedom

FAREWELL SUNDAY. The morning of Sunday, August 23, in the year of grace 1662, should have been black and gloomy with the artillery of rolling thunder, dreadful flashes of lightning, and driving hail and wind to strip the orchards and lay low the corn. For on that day was done a thing which filled the whole country with grief, and bore bitter fruit in after years, of revenge and rebellion. And, because it was the day before that formerly named after Bartholomew, the disciple, it hath been called the Black Bartholomew of England, thus being likened unto that famous day (approved by the Pope) when the French Protestants were treacherously massacred by their King. It should rather be called 'Farewell Sunday' or 'Exile Sunday,' for on that day two thousand godly ministers preached their last sermon in the churches where they had laboured worthily and with good fruit, some during the time of the Protector, and some even longer, because among them were a few who possessed their benefices even from the time of the late King Charles the First. And, since on that day two thousand ministers left their churches and their houses, and laid down their worldly wealth for conscience' sake, there were also, perhaps, as many wives who went with them, and, I dare say, three or four times as many innocent and helpless babes. And, further (it is said that the time was fixed by design and deliberate malice of our enemies), the ministers were called upon to make their choice only a week or two before the day of the collection of their tithes. In other words, they were sent forth to the world at the season when their purses were at the leanest; indeed, with most country clergymen, their purses shortly before the collection of tithes have become well-nigh empty. It was also unjust that their successors should be permitted to collect the tithes due to those who were ejected.It is fitting to begin this history with the Black Bartholomew, because all the troubles and adventures which afterwards befell us were surely caused by that accursed day. One know not certainly, what other rubs might have been ordained for us by a wise Providence (always with the merciful design of keeping before our eyes the vanity of worldly things, the instability of fortune, the uncertainty of life, and the wisdom of looking for a hereafter which shall be lasting, stable, and satisfying to the soul). Still, it must be confessed, such trials as were appointed unto us were, in severity and continuance, far beyond those appointed to the ordinary sort, so that I cannot but feel at times uplifted (I hope not sinfully) at having been called upon to endure so much. Let me not, however, be proud. Had it not been for this day, for certain, our boys would not have been tempted to strike a blow—vain and useless as it proved—for the Protestant religion and for liberty of conscience: while perhaps I should now be forbidden to relate our sufferings, were it not for the glorious Revolution which has restored toleration, secured the Protestant ascendancy, and driven into banishment a Prince, concerning whom all honest men pray that he and his son (if he have, indeed, a son of his own) may never again have authority over this realm.CONTENTSFAREWELL SUNDAYIN THE VILLAGETHE BOYSSIR CHRISTOPHERTHE RUNAWAYBENJAMIN, LORD CHANCELLORMEDICINÆ DOCTORA ROYAL PROGRESSWITH THE ELDERSLE ROY EST MORTBEFORE THE STORMHUMPHREYONE DAYTHE VISION OF THE BASKETA NIGHT AND MORNINGON THE MARCHTAUNTONTHE MAIDS OF TAUNTONKING MONMOUTH AND HIS CAMPBENJAMIN'S WARNINGWE WAIT FOR THE ENDTHE DAY AFTER THE FIGHTIN HIDINGTHE CAMP IN THE COMBILMINSTER CLINKSIR CHRISTOPHERBEFORE THE ASSIZEBENJAMINON WHAT CONDITIONS?A SLIGHT THING AT THE BESTTHE VISION OF CONSOLATIONTHE MAN OF SAMARIAON BOARD THE 'JOLLY THATCHER'THE GOOD SAMARITANTHE WHITE SLAVETHE FIRST DAY OF SERVITUDEBY THE WATERS OF BABYLONHUMPHREY'S NARRATIVEFOR TEN YEARSWITH THE HOEON C
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    The Lady of Lynn

      Walter Besant
The Lady of Lynn

11 Complete Works of Walter Besant Armorel of LyonesseAs We Are and As We May BeHolborn and BloomsburyIn Luck at LastMayfair, Belgravia, and Bayswater,The History of LondonThe Ivory Gate, a new editionThe Lady of LynnThe Strand DistrictVictorian Short Stories, Vol. 2 Westminster
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