The Word Became Flesh: an introductory essay on understanding the human and divine natures of Christ

      Terry R. Lynch
The Word Became Flesh: an introductory essay on understanding the human and divine natures of Christ

“Taking up St. John’s expression ‘The word became flesh’, the church calls ‘Incarnation’ the fact that the Son of God assumed a human nature in order to accomplish our salvation in it.” (CCC #461) Understanding the Incarnation of Christ by way of his human and divine natures.Lina, a 16 year old Iranian girl, has broken the law, a capital offence:she became a Christian. She is arrested and given ONE brutal choice:renounce Christ and confess Allah and Mohammed his prophet. One ofher captors arranges a marriage contract for her to a strong Muslimman who will, “keep her from foolishness and eternal torment with theinfidels”. In such a marriage there would certainly be absoluteobedience and perhaps respect, but could anyone dream that there might be romance and love? She faces extreme darkness with no apparent hope, but then there are also glimmers of brilliant light. In times of greatest stress, Lina feels the presence of her spiritual warrior (guardian angel). In dreams Adonai reveals to Lina facts that could catapult her to undesired fame. The shy girl’s desire to live a quiet life may not be realized. Can she possibly avoid sharing Adonai’s message that will turn the Christian, Jewish, and Muslim world on its head as the Last Day approaches? Her choice could cost her everything. Join Lina’s adventure as she crosses the Middle East to seek God’s Plan for her life and finds God’s next step for the world in Jerusalem.The plight of many Christians in the Middle East is tenuous at best. In many countries the simple act of sharing one’s Christian faith can prove fatal on the spot. Government persecution can be just as repressive. The accusation of Christianity could be terrifying whether true or not. There can be no illusion of “easy believe-ism” here. Under these conditions, how would you react if you were, like Lina, accused of Christianity?
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    Gay Marriage: An Equality Too Far

      Terry R. Lynch
Gay Marriage: An Equality Too Far

Marriage is the voluntary union for life of one man and one woman to the exclusion of all others. It is about two people who love each other but it is more than that. This book covers the argument and ten reasons why traditional marriage should be defended.They won't stay dead .... Who will survive the encounter? Jesse and Willy are violent people, criminals who drift from city to city, one step ahead of disaster. Jesse has a dream reminding her of a boy who once fell in love with her, a boy named Tom whose family was wealthy and generous, living a carefree lifestyle. Jesse persuades Willy to drive her to Tom's hometown with the last of their money. She is convinced the images in her head mean something and their luck will change. Willy could not care less one way or the other. They have no idea what they are getting themselves into. Tom has gone from being a shy, but beautiful boy to becoming a hostile loner with murderous intentions. He harbors in his house an ugly, devastating secret. A secret which is the source of great wealth, but also the source of immeasurable pain ... Their paths cross ... and the dead rise from their graves ... who will survive the encounter?
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    Civil Society, Changing Contemporary Politics with the return of multi-party politics in the Third World & Religion: An Introduction

      Terry R. Lynch
Civil Society, Changing Contemporary Politics with the return of multi-party politics in the Third World & Religion: An Introduction

This essay seeks value from Civil Society in terms of changes in contemporary politics from its ancient origins, Tocqueville perceptions, Gramsci third force interpretations for emancipation of the dis-empowered and its global expansion and interpretation. Assessing how these are achieved and looks at various critiques of the concept to offer a balanced argument. Looking at the studies of analyThis essay seeks value from Civil Society in terms of changes in contemporary politics from its ancient origins, Tocqueville perceptions, Gramsci third force interpretations for emancipation of the dis-empowered and its global expansion and interpretation. Assessing how these are achieved and looks at various critiques of the concept to offer a balanced argument. Looking at the studies of analysts such as Putnam it assesses its usefulness and highlights attitudes within society. Revealing attitudes from society towards their democratic structures and how voting turnout, declining political membership and increasing pressure groups have seen a different approach from society towards democratic institutions. The role of religion within this framework and a selection of key thinkers on the matter of how this civil society and religion fit and act together. The book contains three essays, the third looks at how the return of democratisation with multi-party politics has improved the lives of poor people in the Third World.
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