Sahib, p.62
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       Sahib, p.62

           Richard Holmes
 

  45 Quoted in Grey, European Adventurers, p. 129.

  46 Quoted in Keene, Hindustan, pp. 205-6.

  47 Gurwood, Dispatches, p. 9.

  48 Bennell, Maratha War Papers, p. 239.

  49 Herbert Compton, A Particular Account of the European Military Adventurers in Hindustan from 1781 to 1803 (Lahore: 1976), pp. 399-400.

  50 Bennell, Maratha War Papers, pp. 262-3.

  51 Bennell, Maratha War Papers, p. 311.

  52 Quoted in Grey, European Adventurers, p. 354.

  53 Quoted in Grey, European Adventurers, p. 67.

  54 Compton, European Military Adventurers, p. 369.

  55 Omissi, Sepoy and Raj, pp. 234-5.

  56 Quoted in Anglesey, Cavalry, II, p. 157.

  57 Gurwood, Dispatches, p. 70.

  58 J. Welsh, Reminiscences from a Journal of Nearly Forty Years Active Service (London: 1830), I, pp. 194-5.

  59 Forrest (ed.), Chamberlain, p. 173.

  60 Mountain, Memoirs and Letters, p. 266.

  61 James, Raj, p. 121.

  62 Fortescue, History, XIII, p. 236.

  63 Quoted in Anglesey, Cavalry, II, pp. 128-9.

  64 Lunt (ed.), Sepoy to Subedar, p. 151.

  65 MacGregor (ed.), Life and Opinions, I, p. 231.

  66 Roberts, Forty-One Years, p. 53.

  67 Griffiths, Narrative, pp. 77-8.

  68 Swinson and Scott (eds), Water-field, P. 35.

  69 Forbes-Mitchell, Reminiscences, pp. 127-8.

  70 Wonnacott Papers, British Library Oriental and India Office Collections Mss Eur C376/2.

  71 Rait, Gough, II, p. 325.

  72 Shipp, Paths of Glory, p. 142.

  73 MacGregor (ed.), Life and Opinions, I, p. 99.

  74 Fortescue, History, XII, p. 290.

  75 Captain J. Cumming, ‘The Night of Ferozeshah’, in Army Quarterly, January 1937 pp. 278-9.

  76 Fortescue, History, XII, p. 138.

  77 Forrest (ed.), Chamberlain, pp. 62-3.

  78 Lt Col. F. A. Hayden, Historical Records of the 76th Hindoostan Regiment (Lichfield: no date), p. 27. The younger Lake was killed at the battle of Rolica in the Peninsula (1808), just six months after his father’s death.

  79 Hervey, Soldier of the Company, p. 38. In a ghastly example of a reversal of fortune, this brave man was eventually hanged for murder after shooting his brigadier.

  80 Marsham (ed.), Havelock, p. 131.

  81 Daly (ed.), Memoirs, p. 246.

  82 MacGregor (ed.), Life and Opinions, I, p. 198.

  83 Wolseley, Story, I, pp. 189-200.

  84 Marsham (ed.), Havelock, pp. 434, 450.

  85 Low (ed.), Fifty Years, p. 282.

  86 Anglesey (ed.), Pearman’s Memoirs, p. 57.

  87 Tuker (ed.), Metcalfe, pp. 69-70.

  88 Griffiths, Narrative, pp. 191-2.

  89 MacGregor (ed.), Life and Opinions, I, pp. 92, 114, 127, 318-19.

  90 Shephard, Coote, p. 49.

  91 Bennell, Maratha War Papers, p. 227.

  92 Roberts, Forty-One Years, p. 447.

  93 Francis Younghusband, Indian Frontier Warfare (London: 1898), p. 4.

  94 C. E. Callwell, Small Wars: Their Principles and Practice (London: 1903), P. 399.

  95 Hewett, Eyewitnesses, p. 132.

  96 Tuker (ed.), Metcalfe, p. 29.

  97 Fortescue, History XIII p. 279.

  98 Shephard, Coote, p. 156.

  99 Bennell, Maratha War Papers, p. 289.

  100 Fortescue, History XII, p. 465.

  101 N. C. Hayes, ‘British Tactics in the Fourth and Fifth Maratha Wars’, in Journal of the Society for Army Historical Research, No. 77, 1999.

  102 Shipp, Paths of Glory, p. 66.

  103 Shipp, Paths of Glory, p. 57.

  104 Daly (ed.), Memoirs, p. 11.

  105 Bancroft, Recruit to Staff Sergeant, p. 41.

  106 Bancroft, Recruit to Staff Sergeant p. 51. The incident, suitably dramatised, formed the basis for Kipling’s poem ‘Snarleyow’.

  107 Wolseley, Story, I, pp. 333, 303.

  108 MacGregor (ed.), Life and Opinions, I, p. 196.

  109 Shipp, Paths of Glory, p. 48.

  110 Hewett, Eyewitnesses, p. 113. Laying by ‘line of metal’ meant that Maude aimed straight across the groove in the gun’s breech to the foresight in its swelling muzzle. Because the gun’s breech was broader than its muzzle, this would mean that the piece would be fired with a slight elevation. Trained gunners would know precisely what range ‘line of metal’ would represent for various types of cannon.

  111 Quoted in Maj. Gen. B. P. Hughes, The Bengal Horse Artillery (London: 1971), p. 69.

  112 Gurwood, Dispatches, p. 89.

  113 Williams, Bengal Native Infantry p. 41.

  114 The number varied according to the calibre of the gun and the size of the balls: a 6-pounder shell contained twenty-seven to seventy-five; a 9-pounder forty-one to 127; and the 5.5 inch howitzer had 153.

  115 Barter, Siege of Delhi, p. 14.

  116 Tuker (ed.), Metcalfe, p. 42.

  117 Inglis, Siege of Lucknow, p. 82. Lady Inglis’s husband, John, commanded the garrison during the siege.

  118 Anglesey (ed.), Pearman’s Memoirs, P. 35.

  119 Bancroft, From Recruit to Staff Sergeant, p. 41.

  120 For details of the performance of smoothbore artillery see Terence Wise and Richard Hook, Artillery Equipments of the Napoleonic Wars (Oxford: 1979).

  121 Anglesey (ed.), Pearman’s Memoirs, p. 101.

  122 Barter, Siege of Delhi, pp. 16-17.

  123 Maj. Smith to Col. Mountain, 5 June 1849, Pennycuick Papers.

  124 Ryder in Swinson and Scott (eds), Waterfield, pp. 174-5.

  125 ‘HM IX Regiment entering Allahabad’, painted by H. Martens and published by Ackerman in 1849.

  126 I am grateful to Ian Hook, who looks after the regimental collection in the splendid Chelmsford Museum, for this information.

  127 Roberts, Forty-One Years, p. 215.

  128 Barter, Siege of Delhi, p. 14.

  129 Colonel Edward Vibart, The Sepoy Mutiny as Seen by a Subaltern (London: 1898), pp. 138-9.

  130 Wolseley, Story I, pp. 66-70. A jingal was a heavy musket, usually fired from a wall.

  131 Wolseley, Story I, pp. 309-14.

  132 Williams, Bengal Native Infantry p. 145. This was the usual method of execution for the crime of regicide in France: on 28 March 1757 Robert François Damiens was executed ‘in circumstances of unbelievable horror’ for attacking Louis XV. On that occasion the executioners had to sever the victim’s muscles before the horses could pull the limbs off. See Ian Davidson, Voltaire in Exile (London: 2004), pp. 46-7.

  133 Quoted in Anglesey, Cavalry, I, p. 289.

  134 Mackenzie, Mutiny Memoirs, p. 113.

  135 Joseph Lehmann, Remember You Are An Englishman (London: 1977), p. 232.

  136 Quoted in Anglesey, Cavalry, I, p. 263.

  137 Forbes-Mitchell, Reminiscences, pp. 289-90.

  138 Wilberforce, Unrecorded Chapter, pp. 159-60.

  139 Le Mesurier, Kandahar, p. 57.

  140 Bromfield (ed.), Lahore to Lucknow, pp. 92.

  141 Quoted in Colonel John Sym, Seaforth Highlanders (Aldershot: 1962), p. 56.

  142 Wolseley, Story, I, p. 373.

  143 MacGregor (ed.), Life and Opinions, pp. 64, 80. Angelo’s was the famous London fencing salle.

  144 Williams, Bengal Native Infantry, p. 145.

  145 Coghill Papers, National Army Museum.

  146 Marsham (ed.), Havelock, PP. 293-4.

  147 Forbes-Mitchell, Reminiscences, PP. 95-6.

  148 Quoted in Maxwell, My God: Maiwand, p. 151.

  149 Quoted in Maxwell, My God: Maiwand, p. 177.

  150 Reynolds, Lee-Enfield Rifle, p. 52.

  151 Forbes-Mitchell, Reminiscences, pp. 286-7. This is hearsay evidence: Forbes-Mitchell did not fight in the Sikh wars.

  152 A. M. McKenzie Annand, Cavalry Surgeon (London: 1971), PP. 134-5, 190.

  153 Marsh
am (ed.), Havelock, p. 176.

  154 Quoted in Anglesey, Cavalry, I, p. 274.

  155 Cardew, Hodson’s Horse, p. 258.

  156 Wilberforce, Unrecorded Chapter, pp. 27-8. The story about mercury-filled blades lacks any foundation.

  157 MacGregor (ed.), Life and Opinions, I, pp. 171, 181.

  158 Stephen Wood, ‘Blades of Glory: Swords of Scottish Infantry 1750-1900’, in American Society of Arms Collectors’ Bulletin, No. 72, Spring 1995.

  159 Gordon-Alexander, Recollections, p. 147.

  160 Russell, Mutiny Diary, p. 235.

  161 MacGregor (ed.), Life and Opinions, I, pp. 47-8.

  162 Frederick Roberts, Letters Written during the Indian Mutiny (London: 1924), pp. 93. 109.

  163 Mountain, Memoirs and Letters, PP. 274-5.

  164 Wilberforce, Unrecorded Chapter, PP. 149-50.

  165 Bennell, Maratha Wars, pp. 289-90.

  166 Annand, Cavalry Surgeon, p. 208.

  167 Quoted in Anglesey, Cavalry, I, p. 222.

  168 Quoted in Hector Bolitho, The Galloping Third (London: 1963), pp. 141-2.

  169 Quoted in Bolitho, Galloping Third, pp. 148-50.

  170 Quoted in Anglesey, Cavalry, I, pp. 263-4.

  171 Marsham (ed.), Havelock, p. 166.

  172 Marsham (ed.), Havelock, p. 174.

  173 Anglesey (ed.), Pearman’s Memoirs, p. 68.

  174 Quoted in Anglesey, Cavalry, I, pp. 279-80.

  175 Quoted in Anglesey, Cavalry, I, p. 280.

  176 Quoted in Anglesey, Cavalry, I, p. 287.

  177 Wolseley, Story, I, pp. 353-5.

  178 MacGregor (ed.), Life and Opinions, II, p. 161.

  179 Quoted in Cardew, Hodson’s Horse, p. 58.

  180 Quoted in Yule and Burnell, Hobson-Jobson, p. 702.

  181 Dunlop, Mooltan.

  182 Le Mesurier, Kandahar, p. 64.

  183 G. R. Gleig, Sale’s Brigade in Afghanistan (London: 1846), p. 55.

  184 Although this officer died a major general, he should not be confused with his more famous namesake, Sir Colin Campbell, (later Field Marshal Lord Clyde).

  185 ‘Lieutenant John Pester’, in Brander (ed.), Sword and Pen, pp. 5-6.

  186 Fortescue, History, XII, p. 80.

  187 Pennycuick Diary, Pennycuick Papers, private collection.

  188 Pennycuick Diary, Pennycuick Papers, private collection.

  189 Clark Kennedy, Victorian Soldier, P. 43.

  190 Callwell, Stray Recollections, I, pp. 96-7, 112.

  191 Extract from ‘Parade Song of the Camp Animals’ from Rudyard Kipling’s Verse, p. 559.

  192 Clark Kennedy, Victorian Soldier, P. 49.

  193 Ryder in appendix to Swinson and Scott (eds), Waterfield, p. 165.

  194 Swinson and Scott (eds), Waterfield, pp. 78, 85.

  195 Quoted in Clark Kennedy, Victorian Soldier, p. 59.

  196 Daly (ed.), Memoirs, pp. 46, 51.

  197 Swinson and Scott (eds), Waterfield, pp. 41, 58. Smyth was luckier. His name changed to James Doddington Carmichael, he commanded the 32nd in 1857-60, and, military duties laid aside, at last felt free to marry in 1869.

  198 Shipp, Paths of Glory, p. 75.

  199 Shipp, Paths of Glory, p. 76.

  200 Shipp, Paths of Glory, p. 78.

  201 Griffiths, Narrative, p. 174.

  202 Ryder in Swinson and Scott (eds), Waterfield, p. 170.

  203 Daly (ed.), Memoirs, pp. 147-9.

  204 Germon, Journal, p. 58.

  205 Katharine Mary Bartrum, A Widow’s Reminiscences of the Siege of Lucknow (London: 1858), pp. 35-7.

  206 Inglis, Siege of Lucknow, p. 117.

  207 Germon, Journal, p. 85.

  208 Home, Service Memoirs, pp. 130, 138, 144.

  209 Germon, Journal, p. 108.

  210 Germon, Journal, pp. 92, 93, 97.

  211 L. E. Runtz Rees, A Personal Narrative of the Siege of Lucknow (London: 1858), p. 167.

  212 Rees, Personal Narrative, p. 126.

  213 Home, Service Memoirs, p. 124.

  214 Germon, Journal, pp. 97-8.

  215 Home, Service Memoirs, p. 151.

  216 Russell, Mutiny Diary, p. 51.

  217 Marsham (ed.), Havelock, p. 441.

  218 Germon, Journal, p. 128.

  219 Fortescue, History, XII p. 246.

  220 Ensign C. G. C. Stapylton, ‘The First Afghan War: An Ensign’s Account’, private collection.

  221 MacRory, Patrick (ed), Bryden’s Account, p. 168.

  222 Marsham (ed.), Havelock, pp. 104-5.

  223 Marsham (ed.), Havelock, p. 108.

  224 Gleig, Sale’s Brigade, p. 156.

  225 Stapylton, ‘Ensign’s Account’.

  226 Gleig, Sale’s Brigade, p. 165.

  227 Quoted in Robson, Road to Kabul, p. 168.

  228 MacGregor (ed.), Life and Opinions, II, p. 167.

  229 Quoted in Robson, Road to Kabul, p. 170.

  230 Quoted in Sym, Seaforth Highlanders, pp. 98-9.

  231 Roberts, Forty-One Years, p. 454.

  232 Quoted in Bruce, Six Battles, pp. 322-3.

  233 Home, Service Memoirs, p. 132.

  234 Shipp, Paths of Glory, pp. 70-1.

  235 Gordon-Alexander, Highland Subaltern, p. 280.

  236 Quoted in Tuker (ed.), Metcalfe, pp. 109-10.

  237 Roberts, Forty-One Years, p. 106 and Letters, p. 25.

  238 Quoted in Rees, Personal Narrative, pp. 79-80.

  239 Quennell (ed.), William Hickey, IV, pp. 72-3.

  240 Anglesey (ed.), Pearman’s Memoirs, P. 94.

  241 John Frazer, ‘Field Surgeon at the Battle of Aliwal’, Journal of the Society for Army Historical Research, No. 72, 1994, p. 44.

  242 Bayley, Reminiscences, p. 199.

  243 Elers, Memoirs, p. 93.

  244 Quoted in Bruce, Six Battles, pp. 152-3.

  245 John Edward Wharton Rotton, The Chaplain’s Narrative of the Siege of Delhi (London: 1858), pp. 135-6.

  246 Vibart, Sepoy Mutiny pp. 100-1.

  247 Russell, Mutiny Diary, p. 14.

  248 Russell, Mutiny Diary p. 97.

  249 Bromfield (ed.), Lahore to Lucknow, p. 90.

  250 Shipp, Paths of Glory p. 62.

  251 Elers, Memoirs, pp. 117-18.

  252 Gordon-Alexander, Highland Subaltern, p. 152.

  253 Lutyens, The Lyttons, p. 42.

  V. India’s Exiles

  1 Griffiths, Narrative, p. 175.

  2 Anglesey (ed.), Pearman’s Memoirs, p. 56.

  3 Quoted in Anglesey, Cavalry I, p. 269.

  4 Colonel H. M. Vibart, Richard Baird Smith (London: 1897), p. 63.

  5 Griffiths, Narrative, p. 175.

  6 Anglesey (ed.), Pearman’s Memoirs, P. 37.

  7 George Loy Smith, A Victorian RSM (London: 1987), p. 32.

  8 Wood, Gunner at Large, p. 96.

  9 Samuel West in National Army Museum, 1996-04-220-4.

  10 Quoted in Anglesey, Cavalry I, p. 144.

  11 Gurwood, Dispatches, p. 42.

  12 Bancroft, Recruit to Staff Sergeant, pp. 69-70.

  13 Callwell, Stray Recollections, I, p. 243.

  14 Swinson and Scott (eds), Waterfield, p. 61.

  15 Anglesey (ed.), Pearman’s Memoirs, p. 62.

  16 Ian Colvin, The Life of General Dyer (London: 1929), pp. 4, 16.

  17 Anson, With HM 9th Lancers, p. 2.

  18 ‘LieutenantJohn Pester’, in Brander (ed.), Sword and Pen, pp. 9, 11.

  19 Elers, Memoirs, pp. 120-1.

  20 Wilberforce, Unrecorded Chapter, pp. 167-9.

  21 Mackenzie, Mutiny Memoirs, pp. 189-90.

  22 Wilberforce, Unrecorded Chapter, pp. 8-9.

  23 Kipling’s Verse, p. ??.

  24 Quoted in Birkenhead, Kipling, p. 69.

  25 General order in Gomm Papers, National Army Museum.

  26 Letter of 27 May 1851 in Gomm Papers, National Army Museum.

  27 Carter journal in British Library, Oriental and India Office Collections, Mss Eur E262. Whatever
one’s views about capital punishment, it is clear that George Carter approved of the sentence: there are sharp annotations of ‘yea, yea’ at key points in his journal.

  28 Wolseley, Story, I, pp. 200, 271.

  29 Hervey, Soldier of the Company p. 60.

  30 George Rybot diary, National Army Museum, 7907-99.

  31 Henry Davis van Homrigh Papers, National Army Museum, 6305-55.

  32 Swinson and Scott (eds), Waterfield, p. xiii.

  33 Quoted in Grey, European Adventurers, p. 216.

  34 Wilberforce, Unrecorded Chapter, pp. 41-3.

  35 Griffiths, Narrative, pp. 44-50.

  36 Vansittart (ed.), From Minnie, with Love, p. 104.

  37 Mason, Matter of Honour, p. 202.

  38 Swinson and Scott (eds), Waterfield, P. 34.

  39 Gordon-Alexander, Recollections, p. 6.

  40 Shipp, Paths of Glory, p. 96.

  41 Smith, Victorian RSM, p. 44.

  42 MacGregor, Life and Opinions, II, p. 127.

  43 Quoted in Stephen Wood, ‘Movements for Temperance in the British Army 1835-1895’, Unpublished MA Thesis, University of London, 1984, p. 28.

  44 Quoted in Wood, ‘Temperance’, p. 6.

  45 Quoted in Wood, ‘Temperance’, P. 9.

  46 Smith, Victorian RSM, p. 18.

  47 Quoted in Wood, ‘Temperance’, p. 24.

  48 Shipp, Paths of Glory, p. 49.

  49 A. W. Lawrence (ed.), Captives of Tipu: Survivors’ Narratives (London: 1929), P. 198.

  50 Forbes-Mitchell, Reminiscences, pp. 125-6.

  51 Quennell (ed.), William Hickey, III, p. 159.

  52 Quennell (ed.), William Hickey, IV, P. 327.

  53 Quennell (ed.), William Hickey, IV, PP. 123-33, 140, 159.

  54 Grey, European Adventurers, p. 293.

  55 Quoted in Spear, Nabobs, p. 79.

  56 Gordon, Soldier of the Raj, p. 84.

  57 Quoted in Kincaid, Social Life, p. 94.

  58 Quoted in Spear, Nabobs, p. 35.

  59 Quoted in Compton, European Military Adventurers, p. 359.

  60 Compton, European Military Adventurers, p. 361.

  61 Spear, Nabobs, p. 13.

  62 Quoted in Holman, Sikander Sahib, p. 226.

  63 Fane, Miss Fane, pp. 32-3.

  64 Spear, Nabobs, p. 134.

  65 Quoted in James, Raj, p. 162.

  66 Quoted in Holman, Sikander Sahib, p. 213.

  67 Quoted in Kincaid, Social Life, p. 163.

  68 Kincaid, Social Life, pp. 44-5.

  69 Hervey, Soldier of the Company pp. 71-5.

  70 Lunt (ed.), Sepoy to Subedar, p. 24.

  71 Jane Robinson, Angels of Albion: Women of the Indian Mutiny (London: 1996), p. 14.

 
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