Envy - The Seculary of a Wandering Jew (Book 1)

      Paulo Barata
Envy - The Seculary of a Wandering Jew (Book 1)

In the grand tradition of historical fictional biographies by Robert Graves (I, Claudius), Marguerite Yourcenar (Memories of Hadrian) and Gore Vidal (Julian), THE SECULARY OF A WANDERING JEW - ENVY, brings to light the story of an outsider fated to roam through the ages under the shadows of History.I was a man of my time - a doting father, a devout Jew, a diligent worker, a patriot, or so I believed. But I was destined to be a man for all Time, an immortal.“Who is the man the soldiers are dragging, father?” asked the youngster.“A preacher, I believe.”“But they’re calling him a king, father.” “They’re mocking him, son.”So did I, when I came across this obscure prophet on his way to martyrdom — an encounter that would mold my destiny, force me to question my beliefs, and uproot me from all that I cared for.More than 20 centuries after my birth, I have decided to chronicle my life into a diary — or as I call it, a seculary — of my long haunting existence. You’ll come to know why.Through these journals you are invited to accompany me on an epic journey of an envied, ageless man. An ostracized man, persecuted as the living proof of the divinity of a messiah in whom I never believed. In these pages you will meet some of the protagonists of the age, the ideals and the morality of the times, and learn the real truth behind events that would forever change the fabric of civilization, the very essence of what we are today.
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    Reading Companion to Book 1 of The Seculary of a Wandering Jew

      Paulo Barata
Reading Companion to Book 1 of The Seculary of a Wandering Jew

This is a Guide to Book 1 of The Seculary of a Wandering Jew. It facilitates the reading by providing a general timeline of the epoch and provides in-depth information on the Characters, Geographies and Nomenclatures of the period.Billy and Susan loved to hear their father read stories to them every night at bedtime. Susan told her brother Billy that the stories were for little kids. Susan said, "Billy I love dad, but I wish he would read scary stories to us instead of stories like Peter Pan and Alice and Wonderland. They were ok when we were younger, but we are so much older now." "I feel the same way. I like it when mother and father go out to dinner at night so we can watch scary movies together, "replied Billy."Next time we spend the night with grandma, maybe we can sneak out of bed and see if she has any old creepy books in her attic. If she does we can give them to our father to read to us instead of those boring stories he's been reading over and over for the past several years!" exclaimed Susan. "Tonight we'll ask him if he'll let us spend the night at grandma's house this weekend. I'm sure he'll say yes," said Billy.Night finally arrived. Billy and Susan asked their father if they could spend the night with their grandma tomorrow. Their father said, "I don't see why that would be a problem because your mother and I were planning a weekend trip." Billy and Susan would find their scary book they had been hoping for, but this book should have been left in the attic where it belongs untouched in the trunk where they found it.
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