Uneasy Money

      P. G. Wodehouse / Romance & Love
Uneasy Money

In a day in June, at the hour when London moves abroad in quest of lunch, a young man stood at the entrance of the Bandolero Restaurant looking earnestly up Shaftesbury Avenue—a large young man in excellent condition, with a pleasant, good-humoured, brown, clean-cut face. He paid no attention to the stream of humanity that flowed past him. His mouth was set and his eyes wore a serious, almost a wistful expression. He was frowning slightly. One would have said that here was a man with a secret sorrow. William FitzWilliam Delamere Chalmers, Lord Dawlish, had no secret sorrow. All that he was thinking of at that moment was the best method of laying a golf ball dead in front of the Palace Theatre. It was his habit to pass the time in mental golf when Claire Fenwick was late in keeping her appointments with him. On one occasion she had kept him waiting so long that he had been able to do nine holes, starting at the Savoy Grill and finishing up near Hammersmith. His was a simple mind, able to amuse itself with simple things.
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    Right Ho, Jeeves

      P. G. Wodehouse / Humor
Right Ho, Jeeves

Right Ho, Jeeves is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, the second full-length novel featuring the popular characters Jeeves and Bertie Wooster, after Thank You, Jeeves. It also features a host of other recurring Wodehouse characters, and is mostly set at Brinkley Court, the home of Bertie's Aunt Dahlia. It was first published in the United Kingdom on October 5, 1934 by Herbert Jenkins, London, and in the United States on October 15, 1934 by Little, Brown and Company, Boston, under the title Brinkley Manor. Before being published as a book, it had been sold to the Saturday Evening Post, in which it appeared in serial form from December 23, 1933 to January 27, 1934, and in England in Grand Magazine from April to September 1934. Wodehouse had already started planning this sequel while working on Thank You, Jeeves.
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    The Intrusion of Jimmy

      P. G. Wodehouse / Romance & Love
The Intrusion of Jimmy

Although many might not recognize the name P.G. Wodehouse, they have inevitably come across his work. Wodehouse was a British humorist who wrote novels, short stories, journalism pieces, and other stuff, becoming extremely popular over a 70 year career. Today he is best known for the Jeeves and Blandings Castle novels and short stories, but he was also a playwright and lyricist who was part author and writer of 15 plays and 250 lyrics. Both the name "Jeeves" and the character of Jeeves have become a common part of the English lexicon, meaning a valet or chauffeur. It is even the inspiration behind the popular search engine Ask Jeeves. 
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    The Little Warrior

      P. G. Wodehouse / Romance & Love
The Little Warrior

This romantic narrative set on either side of the Atlantic is a true tale of its time. First published in 1920, Jill the Reckless commences in the better circles of London society. Jill Mariner is engaged to Derek Underhill. Both of these young people are well to do and Derek has a title to boot! What better match could be made? Unfortunately matches made in heaven are generally between just two people. This match depended, alas to a certain extent to the will of Lady Underhill, Derek’s mother.
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    Love Among the Chickens

      P. G. Wodehouse / Humor
Love Among the Chickens

After seeing his friend Stanley Featherstonehaugh Ukridge for the first time in years, author Jeremy Garnet is dragged along on holiday to Ukridge's new chicken farm in Dorset. Hilarious situations abound with Garnet's troublesome courting of a girl living nearby and the struggles on the farm, which are worsened by Ukridge's bizarre business ideas and methods.
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    The Man Upstairs and Other Stories

      P. G. Wodehouse / Humor
The Man Upstairs and Other Stories

Sir Pelham Grenville Wodehouse, (15 October 1881 – 14 February 1975) was an English writer whose body of work includes novels, collections of short stories, and musical theatre. Wodehouse enjoyed enormous popular success during a career of more than seventy years and his prolific writings continue to be widely read. Despite the political and social upheavals that occurred during his life, much of which was spent in France and the United States, Wodehouse's main canvas remained that of pre-war English upper-class society, reflecting his birth, education, and youthful writing career. An acknowledged master of English prose, Wodehouse has been admired both by contemporaries such as Hilaire Belloc, Evelyn Waugh and Rudyard Kipling and by modern writers such as Douglas Adams, Salman Rushdie, Zadie Smith and Terry Pratchett. Journalist and writer Christopher Hitchens commented, "... there is not, and never will be anything to touch him." Best known today for his short stories, Wodehouse was also a playwright and lyricist who was part author and writer of 15 plays and of 250 lyrics for some 30 musical comedies, many of them produced in collaboration with Jerome Kern and Guy Bolton. He worked with Cole Porter on the musical Anything Goes (1934), wrote the lyrics for the hit song "Bill" in Kern's Show Boat (1927), wrote lyrics to Sigmund Romberg's music for the Gershwin – Romberg musical Rosalie (1928), and collaborated with Rudolf Friml on a musical version of The Three Musketeers (1928).
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    The Little Nugget

      P. G. Wodehouse / Humor
The Little Nugget

The Little Nugget is one of the novels in which Wodehouse found his feet, a comic thriller set in an English prep school for the children of the nobility and gentry. Into their midst comes eleven-year-old Ogden Ford, the mouthy, overweight, chain-smoking son of an American millionaire. Ogden (whom we meet again in Piccadilly Jim) is the object of a kidnap attempt which forms the basis of the plot. The comedy arises from Wodehouse’s favourite topics of Anglo-American misunderstanding and the absurdities of school life.
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    Something New

      P. G. Wodehouse / Humor
Something New

The sunshine of a fair Spring morning fell graciously on London town. Out in Piccadilly its heartening warmth seemed to infuse into traffic and pedestrians alike a novel jauntiness, so that bus drivers jested and even the lips of chauffeurs uncurled into not unkindly smiles. Policemen whistled at their posts—clerks, on their way to work; beggars approached the task of trying to persuade perfect strangers to bear the burden of their maintenance with that optimistic vim which makes all the difference. It was one of those happy mornings. At nine o'clock precisely the door of Number Seven Arundell Street, Leicester Square, opened and a young man stepped out.
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    The Adventures of Sally

      P. G. Wodehouse / Humor
The Adventures of Sally

The Adventures of Sally is a novel by P.G. Wodehouse. It appeared as a serial in Collier's magazine in the United States from October 8 to December 31, 1921, and in The Grand Magazine in the United Kingdom from April to July 1922. It was first published in book form in the United Kingdom by Herbert Jenkins on 17 October 1922, and in the U.S. by George H. Doran on March 23, 1923, under the title Mostly Sally.[1] It was serialised again, under this second title, in The Household Magazine from November 1925 to April 1926. The novel relates the adventures of Sally Nicholas, a young American woman who inherits a fortune of $25,000.
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    The Girl on the Boat

      P. G. Wodehouse / Humor
The Girl on the Boat

The Girl on the Boat features red-haired, dog-loving Wilhelmina "Billie" Bennet, and the three men, a long-time friend and admirer of Billie, a lily-livered poet who is engaged to Billie at the opening of the tale, and his dashing cousin, who falls for Billie at first sight. All four find themselves on an ocean liner headed for England together, and typically Wodehousian romantic shenanigans ensue.
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    Piccadilly Jim

      P. G. Wodehouse / Humor
Piccadilly Jim

The novel features Ogden Ford and his mother Nesta (both previously encountered in The Little Nugget (1913)). Nesta has remarried, to the hen-pecked, baseball-loving millionaire Mr. Peter Pett, and Ogden remains spoilt and obnoxious. The story takes its title from the charismatic character of Jimmy Crocker, Nesta's nephew and a reforming playboy. 'Jim' is called upon to assist in the kidnapping of Ogden, amongst much confusion involving imposters, crooks, detectives, butlers, aunts etc. - all in the name of romance of course.
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    A Damsel in Distress

      P. G. Wodehouse / Humor
A Damsel in Distress

P.G. Wodehouse's classic tale of humor, "A Damsel in Distress" is the story of Belpher Castle and it's characters muddle through impending catastrophes and ill-considered love affairs. George Bevan, an American composer of musicals, is in England to attend the performance of one. But when the Lady Patricia Maud Marsh slips into his taxi, he is drawn into the frivolous intrigues of Belpher Castle. George is mistaken for another American with whom Maud has fallen in love. Maud, in turn, is attempting to escape her aunt, Lady Caroline Byng, who is trying to marry Maud off to her step-son, Reginald. Meanwhile, her father, Lord John Marshmoreton, has fallen in love with an actress. As the Castle servants make bets on their Lords’ and Ladies’ capricious attachments,
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