Across india; or, live b.., p.1
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       Across India; Or, Live Boys in the Far East, p.1

          Oliver Optic / Young Adult
Across India; Or, Live Boys in the Far East

Produced by Robert Shimmin, Rudy Ketterer and the Online DistributedProofreading Team.


"He was dressed in the most magnificent robes of India."--Page 234.]


_All-Over-the-World Library--Third Series_


ACROSS INDIA


OR


LIVE BOYS IN THE FAR EAST


BY


OLIVER OPTIC


AUTHOR OF "A MISSING MILLION" "A MILLIONAIRE AT SIXTEEN" "A YOUNG KNIGHT-ERRANT" "STRANGE SIGHTS ABROAD" "AMERICAN BOYS AFLOAT" "THE YOUNG NAVIGATORS" "UP AND DOWN THE NILE" "ASIATIC BREEZES" AND UPWARDS OF ONE HUNDRED OTHER VOLUMES


BOSTON


LEE AND SHEPARD PUBLISHERS


10 MILK STREET


1895


* * * * *


TO


MY LONG-TRIED FRIEND OF MORE THAN FORTY YEARS, WITH WHOM IN ALL THAT TIME, I HAVE NOT HAD A BICKER OR A SHADOW OF UNPLEASANTNESS THOUGH HE HAS BEEN MY SENIOR PUBLISHER FOR MORE THAN AN ENTIRE GENERATION, AND TO WHOM I HAVE NOT DEDICATED A BOOK FOR THIRTY YEARS


WILLIAM LEE


This Volume


IS RESPECTFULLY AND CORDIALLY INSCRIBED BY HIS FAITHFUL AND EVER GRATEFUL FRIEND


WILLIAM T. ADAMS


* * * * *


PREFACE


"Across India" is the first volume of the third series of the"All-Over-the-World Library," in which the voyage of the Guardian-Mother iscontinued from Aden, where some important changes were made in the currentof events, including the disposal of the little steamer Maud, which figuredto a considerable extent in the later volumes of the library, though theyalso comprehended the addition of another and larger consort to the ship,in which the distinguished Pacha, as a reformed and entirely reconstructedperson, sails in company with the voyagers.


A few days out from the port of departure, a stirring event, a catastropheof the sea, adds three very important personages to the cabin passengers ofthe Guardian-Mother, and affords two of the "live boys" an opportunity todistinguish themselves in a work of humanity requiring courage and skill.These additions to the company prove to be a very fortunate acquisition tothe party; for they are entirely familiar with everything in and relatingto India. They are titled individuals, two of the trio, who have not onlytravelled all over the peninsula, but have very influential relations withthe officers of the government, and the native princes, rajahs, kings,maharajahs, and nobles.


The commander, the professor, the surgeon, the young millionaire, andothers who have hitherto given the "talks" and lectures for the instructionof the young people, and incidentally of the older ones also, findthemselves almost entirely relieved from duty in this direction by thosewhom the ship's company have saved from inevitable death in the stormybillows of the Arabian Sea. The gratitude of the two titled members of thetrio, and their earnest appreciation of the educational object of the longvoyage, induce them to make themselves very useful on board.


They do not confine themselves to the duty presented to them in "ConferenceHall;" but they are profuse, and even extravagant, in their hospitality,becoming the hosts of the entire party, and treating them like princes inthe principal cities of India, in all of which they are quite at home. Oneof the Hindu maharajahs proves to be an old friend of both of them, and theparty reside a week at his court; and the time is given up to the study ofmanners and customs, as well as to hunting and the sports of the country.


Felix McGavonty, with Kilkenny blood in his veins, is firm in his beliefthat he ought not to be afraid of snakes, and does for India a little ofwhat St. Patrick did completely for Ireland. The other "live boys," thoughnot so much inclined as the Milesian to battle with the cobra-de-capello,have some experience in shooting tigers, leopards, deer, pythons,crocodiles, and other game, though not enough to wholly satisfy theirnatural enterprise.


The tour of the party is made by railroad in India, from Bombay, taking inLahore, Delhi, Agra, Cawnpoor, Lucknow, Benares, Calcutta, and by theGuardian-Mother to Madras and Ceylon. On the way and in the cities thetitled conductors continue their "talks" and lectures about the placesvisited, with as much of history as time would permit, including an epitomeof those great events in India, the Mutiny of the Sepoys, the "Black Hole,"and other events of the past. The speakers were assisted by elaborate maps,which the reader can find in his atlas. Statistics are given to some extentfor purposes of comparison. Brief notices of the lives of such men asBishop Heber, Sir Colin Campbell, Henry Havelock, and others areintroduced.


The party did not claim to have seen all there was of India; simply to haveobtained "specimen bricks" of the principal cities, with a fair idea of themanners and customs of the people.


WILLIAM. T. ADAMS.


* * * * *


CONTENTS


PAGE


CHAPTER I.


ABOUT FINDING THE LONGITUDE. 1


CHAPTER II.


THE WRECK IN THE ARABIAN SEA. 10


CHAPTER III.


A REVIEW OF THE PAST FOURTEEN MONTHS. 19


CHAPTER IV.


FIRST AND SECOND CUTTERS TO THE RESCUE. 30


CHAPTER V.


THE TITLED GENTLEMEN OF THE TRAVANCORE 40


CHAPTER VI.


THE GENERAL INTRODUCTION IN THE CABIN. 50


CHAPTER VII.


DR. FERROLAN'S EXPLANATION OF THE WRECK 60


CHAPTER VIII.


AN INTERVIEW IN THE CAPTAIN'S CABIN. 70


CHAPTER IX.


CONCERNING THE GEOGRAPHY OF INDIA. 80


CHAPTER X.


THE FLORA AND THE SNAKES OF INDIA 90


CHAPTER XI.


A PLEASANT DINNER-PARTY AT SEA 100


CHAPTER XII.


THE POPULATION AND PEOPLE OF INDIA 109


CHAPTER XIII.


LORD TREMLYN DISCOURSES MORE ABOUT INDIA 118


CHAPTER XIV.


SIR HENRY HAVELOCK AND THE MUTINY 128


CHAPTER XV.


ARRIVAL OF THE GUARDIAN-MOTHER AT BOMBAY 138


CHAPTER XVI.


A MULTITUDE OF NATIVE SERVANTS 148


CHAPTER XVII.


A HOSPITAL FOR THE BRUTE CREATION 158


CHAPTER XVIII.


A SNAKY SPECTACLE IN BOMBAY 168


CHAPTER XIX.


MORE SNAKES AND THE CAVES OF ELEPHANTA 178


CHAPTER XX.


A JUVENILE WEDDING AND HINDU THEATRICALS 187


CHAPTER XXI.


JUGGERNAUT AND JUGGLERS 197


CHAPTER XXII.


A MERE STATEMENT ABOUT BUDDHISM 207


CHAPTER XXIII.


THE UNEXAMPLED LIBERALITY OF THE HOSTS 217


CHAPTER XXIV.


THE RECEPTION OF THE MAHARAJAH AT BARODA 227


CHAPTER XXV.


FELIX MCGAVONTY BRINGS DOWN SOME SNAKES 237


CHAPTER XXVI.


THE MAGNIFICENT PROCESSION OF THE SOWARI 246


CHAPTER XXVII.


VARIOUS COMBATS IN THE GUICOWAR'S ARENA 256


CHAPTER XXVIII.


AT THE CAPITAL OF THE PUNJAB 266


CHAPTER XXIX.


THE WONDERFUL CITY OF DELHI 276


CHAPTER XXX.


THE MAGNIFICENT MAUSOLEUM OF AGRA 286


CHAPTER XXXI.


THE TERRIBLE STORY OF CAWNPORE AND LUCKNOW 296


CHAPTER XXXII.


MORE OF LUCKNOW, AND SOMETHING OF BENARES 306


CHAPTER XXXIII.


A STEAMER TRIP UP AND DOWN THE GANGES 316


CHAPTER XXXIV.


ALL OVER THE CITY OF CALCUTTA 327


CHAPTER XXXV.


A SUCCESSFUL HUNT IN THE SUNDERBUNDS 339


CHAPTER XXXVI.


THE PARTING FESTIVITIES ON THE HOOGLY 351


CHAPTER XXXVII.


THE FAREWELL TO CEYLON AND INDIA 367


* * * * *


LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS



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