The scarlet letter, p.1
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The Scarlet Letter


  Produced by Markus Brenner, Irma Spehar and the OnlineDistributed Proofreading Team at https://www.pgdp.net (Thisfile was produced from images generously made availableby The Internet Archive/American Libraries.)

  THE SCARLET LETTER.

  BY

  NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE.

  Illustrated.

 

  BOSTON: JAMES R. OSGOOD AND COMPANY, LATE TICKNOR & FIELDS, AND FIELDS, OSGOOD, & CO. 1878.

  COPYRIGHT, 1850 AND 1877. BY NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE AND JAMES R. OSGOOD & CO.

  _All rights reserved._ October 22, 1874.

 

 

  PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION.

  Much to the author's surprise, and (if he may say so withoutadditional offence) considerably to his amusement, he finds that hissketch of official life, introductory to THE SCARLET LETTER, hascreated an unprecedented excitement in the respectable communityimmediately around him. It could hardly have been more violent,indeed, had he burned down the Custom-House, and quenched its lastsmoking ember in the blood of a certain venerable personage, againstwhom he is supposed to cherish a peculiar malevolence. As the publicdisapprobation would weigh very heavily on him, were he conscious ofdeserving it, the author begs leave to say, that he has carefully readover the introductory pages, with a purpose to alter or expungewhatever might be found amiss, and to make the best reparation in hispower for the atrocities of which he has been adjudged guilty. But itappears to him, that the only remarkable features of the sketch areits frank and genuine good-humor, and the general accuracy with whichhe has conveyed his sincere impressions of the characters thereindescribed. As to enmity, or ill-feeling of any kind, personal orpolitical, he utterly disclaims such motives. The sketch might,perhaps, have been wholly omitted, without loss to the public, ordetriment to the book; but, having undertaken to write it, heconceives that it could not have been done in a better or a kindlierspirit, nor, so far as his abilities availed, with a livelier effectof truth.

  The author is constrained, therefore, to republish his introductorysketch without the change of a word.

  SALEM, March 30, 1850.

  CONTENTS.

  PAGE

  THE CUSTOM HOUSE.--INTRODUCTORY 1

  THE SCARLET LETTER.

  I. THE PRISON-DOOR 51

  II. THE MARKET-PLACE 54

  III. THE RECOGNITION 68

  IV. THE INTERVIEW 80

  V. HESTER AT HER NEEDLE 90

  VI. PEARL 104

  VII. THE GOVERNOR'S HALL 118

  VIII. THE ELF-CHILD AND THE MINISTER 129

  IX. THE LEECH 142

  X. THE LEECH AND HIS PATIENT 155

  XI. THE INTERIOR OF A HEART 168

  XII. THE MINISTER'S VIGIL 177

  XIII. ANOTHER VIEW OF HESTER 193

  XIV. HESTER AND THE PHYSICIAN 204

  XV. HESTER AND PEARL 212

  XVI. A FOREST WALK 223

  XVII. THE PASTOR AND HIS PARISHIONER 231

  XVIII. A FLOOD OF SUNSHINE 245

  XIX. THE CHILD AT THE BROOK-SIDE 253

  XX. THE MINISTER IN A MAZE 264

  XXI. THE NEW ENGLAND HOLIDAY 277

  XXII. THE PROCESSION 288

  XXIII. THE REVELATION OF THE SCARLET LETTER 302

  XXIV. CONCLUSION 315

 
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