The rebellion in the cev.., p.1
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       The Rebellion in the Cevennes, an Historical Novel. Vol. II., p.1

          part  # of  The Rebellion in the Cevennes, an Historical Novel Series  by  Ludwig Tieck / History & Fiction
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The Rebellion in the Cevennes, an Historical Novel. Vol. II.

Produced by Charles Bowen, from page scans by Google Books.


Source Web Archive:https://www.archive.org/details/rebellioninceve00tiecgoog


THE


REBELLION IN THE CEVENNES,


AN HISTORICAL NOVEL


IN TWO VOLUMES.


BY LUDWIG TIECK.


TRANSLATED FROM THE GERMAN BY MADAME BURETTE.


VOL. II.


LONDON: D. NUTT, FLEET STREET. DUBLIN: J. CUMMING.--EDINBURGH: BELL AND BRADFUTE. 1845.


THE


REBELLION IN THE CEVENNES.


CHAPTER I.


The next morning Edmond felt himself considerably better. Cavaliercontinually flitted before his eyes, and it appeared to him as if armslifted him from his couch, in order to follow his friends. When Eustacehad fallen asleep towards noon, he arose quietly, took his rifle andwith light footsteps hastily descended the mountain path. He felt lightand well, it seemed as if he had never yet walked so rapidly and soindefatigably. He avoided the high road, and again a sort ofinstinctive knowledge conducted him through the shortest and safestways.


When the sun went down and the shadows became darker, images arose inhis imagination more clear and defined with the encreasing obscurity.When night came on, he also distinguished the other forms in the group,his father, Franz, the paternal home and the little slumbering Evelineappeared to him, dark figures were lurking about, threateningdestruction.


An hour before midnight, he was standing on the top of a mountain,beneath him lay a dark valley, a large house, lights gleamed from onlya few of the windows. What was his surprise on recovering hisrecollection. It was his home, and he arrived at it by a road that hehad never before trodden. Here he had lately waved a last farewell tohis father. He descended. He heard whisperings in the vineyard, heperceived figures moving along creeping. Familiar as he was with theplace, he easily gained the back of a rocky wall of a grotto in whichhe heard voices speaking. "It must soon take place," said a hoarsevoice, "and truly as I have arranged, it would be better from thegarden, let us all assemble in the vaulted passage, from thence weshall with greater facility reach the lower window. Two or three othersmight in the mean while ascend the ladder and enter by the window thereabove. The old man, the child and the domestics must be put to death.But no shooting, I tell you, for there are royal troops quite close,who would most certainly forbid us to plunder, on that account also youmust not set fire to the house."


Edmond stole down, behind the barn he found Cavalier and his troop, whowere amazed at seeing him so suddenly and rejoiced at the news hebrought. He conducted them by a different way into the garden andposted them at the back of the entwined arbour, which, moreover, had noopening at the sides. He took half of the troops with him to guard theentrance. The robbers were already in the dark beach avenue; when theysaw men advancing towards them they retreated, but Edmond pursued them;a fray ensued in the obscurity, and Cavalier and his party now alsoappeared and surrounded the assassins. Cavalier quickly caused a torchto be lighted and after a short, but murderous combat, when the bravestof the robbers had fallen, the rest were compelled to surrender,Cavalier caused them to be bound and carried away by his soldiers.


Edmond accompanied by a few followers went in the stillness of nightround the house. He found a ladder ready placed by which it was evidentthat some of the robbers intended to enter. He could not resist theinclination to visit again the house of his childhood. When he reachedthe top, he found the whole household asleep, all the lights wereextinguished. He now opened the hall door, there sat his venerablefather, sleeping in an arm-chair, a night lamp by his side, the holyscriptures open before him. How pale and suffering he looked; for inthe night, fatigue had overpowered him in his meditations. Edmondapproached softly, and with a beating heart. "He has given his angelscharge over thee, that they may keep thee in all thy ways." Thispassage presented itself to his eyes from the open book. Inspired helooked up, wrote his name on a slip of paper and placed it upon thistext of the bible. Then in his dream the old man sighed, "Edmond! myson!"--"Oh how unworthy am I of these tones, this affection, thisattachment!" said Edmond to himself. He was impelled downwards, hekissed his fathers feet and then departed.--He shut the window, causedthe ladder to be carried into the garden and then followed Cavalier'stroop through the night back into the wood.



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