The Bobbsey Twins

      Laura Lee Hope / Young Adult
The Bobbsey Twins

The Bobbsey Twins are the principal characters of what was, for many years, the longest-running series of children's novles. The books related the adventures of the children of the middle-class Bobbsey family, which included two sets of fraternal twins: Bert and Nan, who where 12 years old, and Flossie and Freddie, who where six. Share the stories of your childhood with your children and grandchildren! Here are the original Bobbsey Twin adventures
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    The Bobbsey Twins at Home

      Laura Lee Hope / Young Adult
The Bobbsey Twins at Home

The Bobbsey Twins are the principal characters of what was, for many years, the longest-running series of children's novles. The books related the adventures of the children of the middle-class Bobbsey family, which included two sets of fraternal twins: Bert and Nan, who where 12 years old, and Flossie and Freddie, who where six. Share the stories of your childhood with your children and grandchildren! Here are the original Bobbsey Twin adventures
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    The Bobbsey Twins on Blueberry Island

      Laura Lee Hope / Young Adult
The Bobbsey Twins on Blueberry Island

The Bobbsey Twins are the principal characters of what was, for many years, the longest-running series of children's novles. The books related the adventures of the children of the middle-class Bobbsey family, which included two sets of fraternal twins: Bert and Nan, who where 12 years old, and Flossie and Freddie, who where six. Share the stories of your childhood with your children and grandchildren! Here are the original Bobbsey Twin adventures
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    The Bobbsey Twins at the Seashore

      Laura Lee Hope / Young Adult
The Bobbsey Twins at the Seashore

CHAPTER I CHASING THE DUCK "Suah's yo' lib, we do keep a-movin'!" cried Dinah, as she climbed into the big depot wagon. "We didn't forget Snoop this time," exclaimed Freddie, following close on Dinah's heels, with the box containing Snoop, his pet cat, who always went traveling with the little fellow. "I'm glad I covered up the ferns with wet paper," Flossie remarked, "for this sun would surely kill them if it could get at them." "Bert, you may carry my satchel," said Mrs. Bobbsey, "and be careful, as there are some glasses of jelly in it, you know." "I wish I had put my hat in my trunk," remarked Nan. "I'm sure someone will sit on this box and smash it before we get there." "Now, all ready!" called Uncle Daniel, as he prepared to start oldBill, the horse. "Wait a minute!" Aunt Sarah ordered. "There was another box, I'm sure. Freddie, didn't you fix that blue shoe box to bring along?" "Oh, yes, that's my little duck, Downy. Get him quick, somebody, he's on the sofa in the bay window!" Bert climbed out and lost no time in securing the missing box. "Now we are all ready this time," Mr. Bobbsey declared, while Bill started on his usual trot down the country road to the depot. The Bobbseys were leaving the country for the seashore. As told in our first volume, "The Bobbsey Twins," the little family consisted of two pairs of twins, Nan and Bert, age eight, dark and handsome, and as like as two peas, and Flossie and Freddie, age four, as light as the others were dark, and "just exactly chums," as Flossie always declared. The Bobbsey twins lived at Lakeport, where Mr. Richard Bobbsey had large lumber yards. The mother and father were quite young themselves, and so enjoyed the good times that came as naturally as sunshine to the little Bobbseys. Dinah, the colored maid, had been with the family so long the children at Lakeport called her Dinah Bobbsey, although her real name was Mrs. Sam Johnston, and her husband, Sam, was the man of all work about the Bobbsey home. Our first volume told all about the Lakeport home, and our second book, "The Bobbsey Twins in the Country," was the story of the Bobbseys on a visit to Aunt Sarah and Uncle Daniel Bobbsey in their beautiful country home at Meadow Brook. Here Cousin Harry, a boy Bert's age, shared all the sports with the family from Lakeport. Now the Lakeport Bobbseys were leaving Meadow Brook, to spend the month of August with Uncle William and Aunt Emily Minturn at their seashore home, called Ocean Cliff, located near the village of Sunset Beach. There they were also to meet their cousin, Dorothy Minturn, who was just a year older than Nan. It was a beautiful morning, the very first day of August, that our little party started off. Along the Meadow Brook road everybody called out "Good-by!" for in the small country place all the Bobbseys were well known, and even those from Lakeport had many friends there. Nettie Prentice, the one poor child in the immediate neighborhood (she only lived two farms away from Aunt Sarah), ran out to the wagon as Uncle Daniel hurried old Bill to the depot....
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    The Bobbsey Twins in the Country

      Laura Lee Hope / Young Adult
The Bobbsey Twins in the Country

The Bobbsey Twins are the principal characters of what was, for many years, the longest-running series of children's novles. The books related the adventures of the children of the middle-class Bobbsey family, which included two sets of fraternal twins: Bert and Nan, who where 12 years old, and Flossie and Freddie, who where six. Share the stories of your childhood with your children and grandchildren! Here are the original Bobbsey Twin adventures
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    Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue

      Laura Lee Hope / Young Adult
Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue

This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. This text refers to the Bibliobazaar edition.
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    The Bobbsey Twins at Meadow Brook

      Laura Lee Hope / Young Adult
The Bobbsey Twins at Meadow Brook

CHAPTER I A CROCKERY CRASH "Well, here we are back home again!" exclaimed Nan Bobbsey, as she sat down in a chair on the porch. "Oh, but we have had such a good time!" "The best ever!" exclaimed her brother Bert, as he set down the valise he had been carrying, and walked back to the front gate to take a small satchel from his mother. "I'm going to carry mine! I want to carry mine all the way!" cried little fat Freddie Bobbsey, thinking perhaps his bigger brother might want to take, too, his bundle. "All right, you can carry your own, Freddie," said Bert, pleasantly."But it's pretty heavy for you." "It—it isn't very heavy," panted Freddie, as he struggled on with his bundle, his short fat legs fairly "twinkling" to and fro as he came up the walk. "It's got some cookies in, too, my bundle has; and Flossie and I are going to eat 'em when we get on the porch." "Oh, so that's the reason you didn't want Bert to take your package, is it?" asked Mrs. Bobbsey, with a smile, as she patted the little fat chap on the head. "Oh, well, I'll give Bert a cookie if he wants one," said Freddie, generously, "but I'm strong enough to carry my own bundle all the way; aren't I, Dinah?" and he appealed to a fat, good-natured looking colored woman, who was waddling along, carrying a number of packages. "Dat's what yo' is, honey lamb! Dat's what yo' is!" Dinah exclaimed. "An' ef I could see dat man ob mine, Sam Johnson, I'd make him take some ob dese yeah t'ings." As Dinah spoke there came from around the corner of the house a tall, slim colored man, who as soon as he saw the party of returning travelers, ran forward to help them carry their luggage. "Well, it's about time dat yo' come t' help us, Sam Johnson!" exclaimed his wife. "It's about time!" "Didn't know yo' all was a-comin', Dinah! Didn't know yo' all would get heah so soon, 'deed I didn't!" Sam exclaimed, with a laugh, that showed his white teeth in strange contrast to his black face. "Freddie, shall I take yo' package? Flossie, let me reliebe yo', little Missie!" "No, Sam, thank you!" answered the little girl, who was just about the size and build of Freddie. "I have only Snoop, our cat, and I can carry him easily enough. You help Dinah!" "'Deed an' he had better help me!" exclaimed the colored cook. Sam took all the packages he could carry, and hurried with them to the stoop. But he had not gone very far before something happened. From behind him rushed a big dog, barking and leaping about, glad, probably, to be home again from part of the summer vacation. "Look out, Sam!" called Bert Bobbsey, who was carrying the valise his mother had had. "Look out!" "What's de mattah? Am I droppin' suffin?" asked Sam, trying to turn about and look at all the bundles and packages he had in his arms and hands. "It's Snap!" cried Nan, who was sitting comfortably on the shady porch. "Look out for him, Sam." "Snap! Behave yourself!" ordered little fat Flossie, as she set down a wooden cage containing a black cat. "Be good, Snap!" "Here, Snap!...
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    The Bobbsey Twins on a Houseboat

      Laura Lee Hope / Young Adult
The Bobbsey Twins on a Houseboat

CHAPTER I GOOD NEWS "What are you doing, Freddie?" asked Bert Bobbsey, leaning over to oil the front wheel of his bicycle, while he glanced at his little brother, who was tying strings about the neck of a large, handsome dog. "Making a harness," answered Freddie, not taking time to look up. "A harness?" repeated Bert, with a little laugh. "How can you make a harness out of bits of string?" "I'm going to have straps, too," went on Freddie, keeping busily on with his work. "Flossie has gone in after them. It's going to be a fine, strong harness." "Do you mean you are going to harness up Snap?" asked Bert, and he stood his bicycle against the side of the house, and came over to where Freddie sat near the big dog. "Yes. Snap is going to be my horse," explained Freddie. "I'm going to hitch him to my express wagon, and Flossie and I are going to have a ride." "Ha! Ha!" laughed Bert. "You won't get much of a ride with THAT harness," and he looked at the thin cord which the small boy was winding about the dog's neck. "Why not?" asked Freddie, a little hurt at Bert's laughter. Freddie, like all small boys, did not like to be laughed at. "Why, Snap is so strong that he'll break that string in no time," saidBert. "Besides—" "Flossie's gone in for our booty straps, I tell you!" said Freddie. "Then our harness will be strong enough. I'm only using string for part of it. I wish she'd hurry up and come out!" and Freddie glanced toward the house. But there was no sign of his little sister Flossie. "Maybe she can't find them," suggested Bert. "You know what you andFlossie do with your books and straps, when you come home from schoolFriday afternoons—you toss them any old place until Monday morning." "I didn't this time!" said sturdy little Freddie, looking up quickly. "I—I put 'em—I put 'em—oh, well, I guess Flossie can find 'em!" he ended, for trying to remember where he had left his books was more than he could do this bright, beautiful, Saturday morning, when there was no school. "I thought so!" laughed Bert, as he turned to go back to his bicycle, for he intended to go for a ride, and had just cleaned, and was now oiling, his wheel. "Well, Flossie can find 'em, so she can," went on Freddie, as he held his head on one side and looked at a knotted string around the neck of Snap, the big dog. "I wonder how Snap is going to like it?" asked Bert. "Did you ever hitch him to your express wagon before, Freddie?" "Yes. But he couldn't pull us." "Why not?" "'Cause I only had him tied with strings, and they broke. But I'm going to use our book straps now, and they'll hold." "Maybe they will—if you can find 'em—or if Flossie can," Bert went on with a laugh. Freddie said nothing. He was too busy tying more strings about Snap's neck. These strings were to serve as reins for the dog-horse. Since Snap would not keep them in his mouth, as a horse does a bit, they had to go around his neck, as oxen wear their yokes. Snap stretched out comfortably on the grass, his big red tongue hanging out of his mouth....
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    The Bobbsey Twins at the County Fair

      Laura Lee Hope / Young Adult
The Bobbsey Twins at the County Fair

The Bobbsey Twins are the principal characters of what was, for many years, the longest-running series of children's novles. The books related the adventures of the children of the middle-class Bobbsey family, which included two sets of fraternal twins: Bert and Nan, who where 12 years old, and Flossie and Freddie, who where six. Share the stories of your childhood with your children and grandchildren! Here are the original Bobbsey Twin adventures
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    The Bobbsey Twins in a Great City

      Laura Lee Hope / Young Adult
The Bobbsey Twins in a Great City

THE ICE-BOAT "Oh, there comes my skate off again! Freddie, have you got any paste in your pocket?" "Paste, Flossie! What good would paste be to fasten on your skate?" "I don't know, but it might do some good. I can't make the strap hold it on any more," and a plump little girl shook back her flaxen, curling hair, which had slipped from under her cap and was blowing into her eyes, sat down on a log near the shore of the frozen lake and looked sorrowfully at the shining skate which had become loosened from her shoe. "Come on, Flossie!" called the small, plump boy, just about the size of his sister, and with her same kind of light hair and blue eyes. "There go Bert, Nan and Tommy Todd 'way ahead of us. We'll never catch up to 'em if you sit here. Come on!" "I can't help sitting here, Freddie Bobbsey! How am I going to skate on only one skate?" asked the little girl. "Put on the other, and come along." "I have put it on, lots of times, but it comes off every time I skate a little bit. That's why I want some paste. Maybe I could paste the strap fast around my shoe." "I don't believe you could, Flossie," and this time the small, plump boy stopped skating around in a ring—"grinding the bar," as it is called—and glided toward his sister seated on the log. "Anyhow, I haven't any paste. What made you think I had?" "Oh, you carry so much stuff in your pockets I thought maybe you'd have paste." "I might if it was summer, Flossie, and I was making kites with Bert. But I haven't any paste now." "Then have you got a postage stamp?" "A postage stamp? Of course not! What good would a postage stamp be to fasten your skate strap?" "Well, a postage stamp has paste on it, hasn't it? Anyhow, it's sticky, 'cause I got some on my tongue once, and I just know if I could only fasten down the end of this skate strap, to keep it from flopping up, and coming out of the buckle, I'd be all right. It's the flopping end that comes loose." "Well, pooh! a postage stamp wouldn't be any good!" cried Freddie. "If you did stick it on it wouldn't last more than three strokes. A postage stamp wouldn't go far at all!" "Some postage stamps do!" exclaimed Flossie. "Mother got one on a letter the other day and it had stuck itself on half-way round the world—she told me so. And if a stamp sticks half-way around the world I should think it would stick while I skated down to the end of the lake." "Huh! That's different!" half grunted Freddie, for, just then, he was stooping over tightening one of his straps. "Anyhow, I haven't got a stamp." "Well, maybe you could fix my skate so it wouldn't come off," suggested Flossie. "I've tried and tried, but I can't, and I don't want to stay here all alone." "Why Flossie Bobbsey! I'm with you!" "I know, but Nan and Bert are away down at the other end, with Tommy Todd, and Bert is going to buy hot chocolates. I know he is, 'cause he said so. I don't want to miss them." "Me neither! Wait and I'll see if I can't fix your skate, Flossie." Freddie was small—he and Flossie were the smaller pair of Bobbsey twins—but he was a sturdy little chap, and living out of doors, and playing games with his older brother Bert had taught Freddie how to do many things....
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    The Bobbsey Twins at Snow Lodge

      Laura Lee Hope / Young Adult
The Bobbsey Twins at Snow Lodge

The Bobbsey Twins are the principal characters of what was, for many years, the longest-running series of children's novles. The books related the adventures of the children of the middle-class Bobbsey family, which included two sets of fraternal twins: Bert and Nan, who where 12 years old, and Flossie and Freddie, who where six. Share the stories of your childhood with your children and grandchildren! Here are the original Bobbsey Twin adventures
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    The Bobbsey Twins in Washington

      Laura Lee Hope / Young Adult
The Bobbsey Twins in Washington

CHAPTER I UNDER THE HAY "This is 'most as much fun as we had on Blueberry Island, or when we went to Florida on the deep, blue sea, isn't it, Bert?" asked Nan Bobbsey, as she sat on the porch and fanned herself with her hat. She and her brother had been running around the house, playing a new game, and Nan was warm. "Yes, it's fun all right," agreed Bert. "But I liked the deep, blue sea better—or even Blueberry Island," and off came his hat to cool his flushed face, for, though it was late in September, the day was warm. "But we couldn't stay on the island, always," went on Nan. "We have to go to school, daddy says!" "Don't speak about it!" begged Bert. "I don't want to go to school for a long, long time, and not then!" "Have we got to go to school?" asked a little light-haired and blue-eyed girl, as she ran up the steps, to sink in a heap at the feet of her sister, Nan Bobbsey. "When do we go?" she went on. "Oh, not right away, 'little fat fairy!'" laughed Nan, giving Flossie the name her father sometimes called her. "School won't open for two weeks more." "Hurray!" cried Bert. "The longer it stays closed the better I like it.But come on, Nan! Let's have some more fun. This isn't like BlueberryIsland, sitting still on a porch!" "You haven't sat still more than three minutes, Bert Bobbsey!" cried his sister. "I can hardly get my breath, you made me run so fast!" Just then a little boy, who had the same sort of blue eyes and golden hair that made Flossie such a pretty little girl, came tumbling up the steps with a clatter and a bang, falling down at Bert's feet. The older boy caught his small brother just in time, or there might have been a bumped nose. "Hi there, Freddie, what's the matter?" asked Bert, with a laugh. "Is our dog Snap chasing you, or have you been playing a trick on our cat Snoop?" "I—I—I'm a—a fireman!" panted Freddie. for he, too, was out of breath from running. "I'm a fireman, and I—I've got to get the engine. There's a big, big fire!" and his eyes opened wide and round. "A big fire—really?" asked Nan quickly. "Course not! He's only making believe!" replied Bert. "Well, I thought maybe he might have seen some boys start a bonfire somewhere," explained Nan. "They sometimes do." "I know they do," admitted Bert. "And I hope they don't start one near daddy's lumberyard." "There was a fire down in the lumber once!" exclaimed Freddie. He was too young to have seen it, but he had heard his father and mother talk about the time Mr. Bobbsey's lumberyard was nearly burned out. Freddie Bobbsey was very fond of a toy fire engine he had been given for Christmas, and his father often called Freddie a "little fireman," just as Flossie was named a "fairy." "Well, if it's only a make-believe fire we can sit here and cool off," went on Nan. "What were you doing, Flossie?" she asked her little sister. "Oh, I was having a race with our cat Snoop; but I guess I beat, 'causeSnoop didn't get here to the porch before I did." "Yes, you won the race all right," laughed Bert....
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    The Bobbsey Twins at Cedar Camp

      Laura Lee Hope / Young Adult
The Bobbsey Twins at Cedar Camp

The Bobbsey Twins are the principal characters of what was, for many years, the longest-running series of children's novels. The books related the adventures of the children of the middle-class Bobbsey family, which included two sets of fraternal twins: Bert and Nan, who were 12 years old, and Flossie and Freddie, who were six. Share the stories of your childhood with your children and grandchildren! Here are the original Bobbsey Twins adventures.
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