Adrift in New York: Tom and Florence Braving the World

      Jr. Horatio Alger
Adrift in New York: Tom and Florence Braving the World

Horatio Alger (1832 - 1899) was one of the most influential American authors of the 19th century, who wrote Adrift in New York: or, Tom and Florence Braving the World. A prolific author, he wrote more than a hundred books on the same theme: that honesty, cheerfulness, virtue, thrift, and hard work would be rewarded with success. While his plots and dialogue sometimes lacked creativity, he can be credited with helping to create an uniquely American philosophy of Strive and Succeed. Titles such as Sink or Swim, Shifting for Himself, and Adrift in New York: or, Tom and Florence Braving the World convinced generations that they could triumph over their circumstances and become an Alger Hero
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    Facing the World

      Jr. Horatio Alger
Facing the World

It was a terrible night. None of the passengers ventured upon deck. Indeed, such was the motion that it would have been dangerous, as even the sailors found it difficult to keep their footing. Harry was pale and quiet, unlike his friend from Brooklyn, whose moans were heard mingled with the noise of the tempest.
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    Bound to Rise; Or, Up the Ladder

      Jr. Horatio Alger
Bound to Rise; Or, Up the Ladder

An inspirational story about how individual traits and efforts help one to rise and progress. It is the story that eloquently compares and contrasts between two characters: their attitudes, efforts and consequently their success and failure. It centers around a fourteen-year-old boy named Harry who leaves home in search of work. He is determined to pay a debt his father was forced to incur. By hard work and perseverance as well as his motto "Live and Learn" Harry overcomes challenges to meet his goal and returns victorious.
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    Andy Grant's Pluck

      Jr. Horatio Alger
Andy Grants Pluck

A boy's family met a misfortune and he had to be pulled out from school. Through adversities and trials, young Andy Grant stayed a principled person and became successful. This is one of Alger's many books with the theme of overcoming adversity and reaching for one's dream. A must read for all.
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    The Store Boy

      Jr. Horatio Alger
The Store Boy

Ben Barclay checked the horse he was driving and looked attentively at the speaker. He was a stout-built, dark-complexioned man, with a beard of a weeks growth, wearing an old and dirty suit, which would have reduced any tailor to despair if taken to him for cleaning and repairs. A loose hat, with a torn crown, surmounted a singularly ill-flavored visage. A tramp, and a hard-looking one! said Ben to himself. He hesitated about answering, being naturally reluctant to have such a traveling companion. Well, what do you say? demanded the tramp, rather impatiently. There splenty of room on that seat, and Im dead tired. Where are you going? said Ben.(Typographical errors above are due to OCR software and don't occur in the book.)About the Publisher Forgotten Books is a publisher of historical writings, such as: Philosophy, Classics, Science, Religion, History, Folklore and Mythology.Forgotten Books' Classic Reprint Series utilizes the latest technology to regenerate facsimiles of historically important writings. Careful attention has been made to accurately preserve the original format of each page whilst digitally enhancing the aged text. Read books online for free at www.forgottenbooks.org --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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    Brave and Bold; Or, The Fortunes of Robert Rushton

      Jr. Horatio Alger
Brave and Bold; Or, The Fortunes of Robert Rushton

Brave and Bold was the first in a new series of Alger novels published by Loring, and the first in which sex rears its head. Before Brave and Bold, the girls of the hero's age were sisters or simply prop figures. In this new book, Hester Paine, the lovely daughter of Millville's most prominent citizen and the reigning village belle, becomes a source of fascination and contention for "factory boy" hero Robert Rushton and his nemesis, the rich, snobbish, kid glove-wearing youth Halbert Davis. Brave and Bold hit a new high in Alger's work, according Edwin Hoyt, but Hoyt describes the story as a "fiasco".[3] Gary Scharnhorst describes it as "horrifying", and lists a shooting, a stabbing, and a suicide among the book's elements.[4] The book was reviewed by a reader of the children's magazine St. Nicholas; he described it as "of the sensational order" and was glad he did not meet its characters in real life. This was the last review of an Alger work published by the prestigious magazine. The book initiated the controversy over making Alger's works available to the young.
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    Paul Prescott's Charge

      Jr. Horatio Alger
Paul Prescotts Charge

If you’ve ever used the phrase “rags to riches,” you owe that to Horatio Alger, Jr. (1832-1899), who popularized the idea through his fictional writings that also served as a theme for the way America viewed itself as a country. Alger’s works about poor boys rising to better living conditions through hard work, determination, courage, honesty, and morals was popular with both adults and younger readers. Alger’s writings happened to correspond with America’s Gilded Age, a time of increasing prosperity in a nation rebuilding from the Civil War. His lifelong theme of rags to riches continued to gain popularity but has gradually lessened since the 1920s. Still, readers today often come across Ragged Dick and stories like it in school.
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    Paul the Peddler; Or, The Fortunes of a Young Street Merchant

      Jr. Horatio Alger
Paul the Peddler; Or, The Fortunes of a Young Street Merchant

This book was digitized and reprinted from the collections of the University of California Libraries. It was produced from digital images created through the libraries’ mass digitization efforts. The digital images were cleaned and prepared for printing through automated processes. Despite the cleaning process, occasional flaws may still be present that were part of the original work itself, or introduced during digitization. This book and hundreds of thousands of others can be found online in the HathiTrust Digital Library at www.hathitrust.org. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.
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    From Farm to Fortune; or, Nat Nason's Strange Experience

      Jr. Horatio Alger
From Farm to Fortune; or, Nat Nasons Strange Experience

Nat Nason was a poor country boy with a strong desire to better his condition. Life on the farm was unusually hard for him, and after a quarrel with his miserly uncle, with whom he resided, he resolved to strike out for himself. This novel will show the difference between life in a quiet country place and in a great bustling city, and especially as that difference shows itself to the eyes of a country boy. Life is not easy, you need to worked hard to earn fame and success.
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    The Young Explorer; Or, Claiming His Fortune

      Jr. Horatio Alger
The Young Explorer; Or, Claiming His Fortune

Ben heard every word that was said, and it confirmed his suspicions. There was no doubt that an attempt would be made to rob him and his companion before morning, and the prospect was not pleasant. By submitting quietly he would come to no harm, and the loss of the money would not be irreparable. He and Bradley had each started with a hundred dollars, supplied by Miss Doughlas, and thus far but little of this sum had been spent. Their employer would doubtless send them a further supply if they were robbed, but they would be reluctant to apply to her, since the loss would be partly the result of their imprudence.
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    In A New World; or, Among The Gold Fields Of Australia

      Jr. Horatio Alger
In A New World; or, Among The Gold Fields Of Australia

If you’ve ever used the phrase “rags to riches,” you owe that to Horatio Alger, Jr. (1832-1899), who popularized the idea through his fictional writings that also served as a theme for the way America viewed itself as a country. Alger’s works about poor boys rising to better living conditions through hard work, determination, courage, honesty, and morals was popular with both adults and younger readers. Alger’s writings happened to correspond with America’s Gilded Age, a time of increasing prosperity in a nation rebuilding from the Civil War. His lifelong theme of rags to riches continued to gain popularity but has gradually lessened since the 1920s. Still, readers today often come across Ragged Dick and stories like it in school.
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    Phil, the Fiddler

      Jr. Horatio Alger
Phil, the Fiddler

If you’ve ever used the phrase “rags to riches,” you owe that to Horatio Alger, Jr. (1832-1899), who popularized the idea through his fictional writings that also served as a theme for the way America viewed itself as a country. Alger’s works about poor boys rising to better living conditions through hard work, determination, courage, honesty, and morals was popular with both adults and younger readers. Alger’s writings happened to correspond with America’s Gilded Age, a time of increasing prosperity in a nation rebuilding from the Civil War. His lifelong theme of rags to riches continued to gain popularity but has gradually lessened since the 1920s. Still, readers today often come across Ragged Dick and stories like it in school.
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    Joe's Luck; Or, Always Wide Awake

      Jr. Horatio Alger
Joes Luck; Or, Always Wide Awake

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1909 edition. Excerpt: ...to discover where Joe lay, wake him up, and force him, by threats of instant death as the penalty for non-compliance, to deliver up all the money he had in the restaurant. Now, it happened that Joe and his guest slept in opposite corners of the room. Rafferty discovered Joe, but was entirely ignorant of the presence of another person in the apartment. Joe waked on being rudely shaken. "Who is it?" he muttered drowsily. "Never mind who it is!" growled Jack in his ear. "It's a man that'll kill you if you don't give up all the money you've got about you!" Joe was fully awake now, and realized the situation. He felt thankful that he was not alone, and it instantly flashed upon him that Watson had a revolver. But Watson was asleep. To obtain time to form a plan, he parleyed a little. "You want my money?" he asked, appearing to be confused. "Yes--and at once! Refuse, and I will kill you!" I won't pretend to deny that Joe's heart beat a little quicker than its wont. He was thinking busily. How could he attract Watson's attention? "It's pretty hard, but I suppose I must," he answered. "That's the way to talk." "Let me get up and I'll get it." Joe spoke so naturally that Rafferty suspected nothing. He permitted our hero to rise, supposing that he was going for the money he demanded. Joe knew exactly where Watson lay and went over to him. He knelt down and drew out the revolver from beneath his head, at the same time pushing him, in the hope of arousing him. The push was effectual. Watson was a man whose experience at the mines had taught him to rouse at once. He just heard Joe say: "Hush!" "What are you so long about?" demanded Rafferty suspiciously. "I've.got a revolver," said Joe unexpectedly; "and, if you don't leave the room, I'll fire!" With an oath,...
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