The Deluge: An Historical Novel of Poland, Sweden, and Russia. Vol. 1 (of 2)

      Henryk Sienkiewicz / History & Fiction
The Deluge: An Historical Novel of Poland, Sweden, and Russia. Vol. 1 (of 2)

THE DELUGE. An Historical Novel OF POLAND, SWEDEN, AND RUSSIA.A SEQUEL TO “WITH FIRE AND SWORD.”BYHENRYK SIENKIEWICZ.AUTHORIZED AND UNABRIDGED TRANSLATION FROM THE POLISH BYJEREMIAH CURTIN.IN TWO VOLUMES.VOLUMES 1 and 2 1915.Copyright, 1891, by Jeremiah Curtin. TO HON. CHARLES A. DANA,Editor of “The Sun,”New York.Sir,--I beg to dedicate to you this translation of a remarkable work, touching a period eventful in the history of the Poles, and the Slav race in general. You will appreciate the pictures of battle and trial contained in these volumes, for you know great events not from books merely but from personal contact. You receive pleasure from various literatures, and from considering those points of character by which nations and men are distinguished; hence, as I think, THE DELUGE will give you some mental enjoyment, and perhaps turn your attention to a new field of history.JEREMIAH CURTIN.Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of Ethnology,November 25, 1891. INTRODUCTION.The wars described in THE DELUGE are the most complicated and significant in the whole career of the Commonwealth, for the political motives which came into play during these wars had their origin in early and leading historical causes.The policy of the Teutonic Knights gave the first of its final results in the war of 1655, between Sweden and Poland, since it made the elector independent in Prussia, where soon after, his son was crowned king. The war with Great Russia in 1654, though its formal cause came, partly at least, from the struggle of 1612, in which the Poles had endeavored to subjugate Moscow, was really roused by the conflict of Southern Russian with Poland to win religious and material equality.The two fundamental events of Polish history are the settlement of the Teutonic Knights in Prussia, through the action of the Poles themselves; and the union of Poland with Lithuania and Russia by the marriage of Yadviga, the Polish princess, to Yagyello, Grand Prince of Lithuania.Before touching on the Teutonic Knights, a few words may be given to the land where they began that career which cut off Poland from the sea, took from the Poles their political birthplace, and gave its name and territory to the chief kingdom of the new German Empire, the kingdom which is in fact the creator and head of that Empire.Prussia in the thirteenth century extended from the Vistula eastward to the Niemen, and from the Baltic southward about as far as it does at present. In this territory lived the Prussians. East of the Niemen lived the Lithuanians, another division of the same stock of people. West of the Vistula lay Pomorye, [Means “On the sea”] now Pomerania, occupied at that time exclusively by Slavs under Polish dominion.The Prussians, a people closely related to the Slavs, were still Pagans, as were also the Lithuanians; and having a more highly developed religion than either the pre-Christian Slavs or the Germans, their conversion was likely to be of a more difficult nature.At the end of the tenth and in the beginning of the thirteenth centuries attempts were made to convert the Prussians; but the only result was the death of the missionaries, who seem to have been too greatly filled with zeal to praise their own faith and throw contempt on that of the people among whom they were really only guests and sojourners.Finally, a man appeared more adroit and ambitious than others,--Christian, a monk of Olivka, near Dantzig. This monk, we are told, had a knowledge of the weak points of men, spoke Prussian as well as Polish, was not seeking the crown of martyrdom, and never made light of things held sacred by those to whom he was preaching. After a few years his success was such as to warrant a journey to Rome, where he explained to Innocent III. the results of his labor. The Pope encouraged the missionary, and in 1211 instructed the Archbishop of Gnez
Read online

    The Deluge: An Historical Novel of Poland, Sweden, and Russia. Vol. 2 (of 2)

      Henryk Sienkiewicz / History & Fiction
The Deluge: An Historical Novel of Poland, Sweden, and Russia. Vol. 2 (of 2)

At a time when the state of Poland was constantly undergoing political turmoil, Henryk Sienkiewicz wasn’t afraid to ruffle feathers. Having already achieved success in his career around the end of the 19th century, the Polish journalist negatively portrayed the Teutonic Order at a time in which his audience lived under German rule. At the same time, he meticulously included historical language in his works, a sort of celebration of authenticity and the past. He would earn a Nobel Prize in 1905 for "outstanding merits as an epic writer." Sienkiewicz mastered historical novels that vividly put readers in places as distinct as 17th century Poland and Ancient Rome. He is still well regarded today for novels like With Fire and Sword, The Deluge, Quo Vadis, and Fire in the Steppe.  
Read online

    W pustyni i w puszczy. English

      Henryk Sienkiewicz / Actions & Adventure
W pustyni i w puszczy. English

In Desert and Wilderness (Polish: W Pustyni i w Puszczy) is a popular young adult novel by Nobel Prize-winning novelist Henryk Sienkiewicz, written in 1912. In Desert and Wilderness tells the story of two young friends, Stas Tarkowski and Nel Rawlison, kidnapped by rebels during Mahdi's rebellion in Sudan. W Pustyni i w Puszczy to popularna powieść dla dzieci i młodzieży autorstwa Henryka Sienkiewicza. Opowiada ona losy Stasia Tarkowskiego i Nel Rawlison, porwanych przez rebeliantów w Sudanie.Publikacja w dwóch wersjach językowych - po angielsku i po polsku.
Read online

    Quo Vadis: A Narrative of the Time of Nero

      Henryk Sienkiewicz / History & Fiction
Quo Vadis: A Narrative of the Time of Nero

Quo Vadis: A Narrative of the Time of Nero, commonly known as Quo Vadis, is a historical novel written by Henryk Sienkiewicz. "Quo vadis Domine" is Latin for "Where are you going, Lord?" and alludes to the apocryphal Acts of Peter, in which Peter flees Rome but on his way meets Jesus and asks him why he is going to Rome. Jesus says, "I am going back to be crucified again", which makes Peter go back to Rome and accept martyrdom. The novel Quo Vadis tells of a love that develops between a young Christian woman, Ligia, and Marcus Vinicius, a Roman patrician. It takes place in the city of Rome under the rule of emperor Nero, c. AD 64. Sienkiewicz studied the Roman Empire extensively prior to writing the novel, with the aim of getting historical details correct. Consequently, several historical figures appear in the book. As a whole, the novel carries an outspoken pro-Christian message. Published in installments in three Polish dailies in 1895, it came out in book form in 1896 and has since been translated into more than 50 languages. Quo Vadis contributed to Sienkiewicz's Nobel Prize for literature in 1905. This book has a beautiful glossy cover and a blank page for the dedication.
Read online

    Let us follow Him

      Henryk Sienkiewicz / History & Fiction
Let us follow Him

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
Read online