HENRY JAMES SERIES:

    The Portrait of a Lady — Volume 1

      Henry James / Romance & Love
The Portrait of a Lady — Volume 1

The Portrait of a Lady is a novel by Henry James, first published as a serial in The Atlantic Monthly and Macmillan's Magazine in 1880-1881 and then as a book in 1881. It is the story of a spirited young American woman, Isabel Archer, who "affronts her destiny" and finds it overwhelming. She inherits a large amount of money and subsequently becomes the victim of Machiavellian scheming by two American expatriates. Like many of James's novels, it is set mostly in Europe, notably England and Italy. Generally regarded as the masterpiece of his early phase of writing, this novel reflects James's absorbing interest in the differences between the New World and the Old. It also treats in a profound way the themes of personal freedom, responsibility, betrayal, and sexuality.
Read online

    Washington Square

      Henry James / Romance & Love
Washington Square

Washington Square is a short novel by Henry James. Originally published in 1880 as a serial in Cornhill Magazine and Harper's New Monthly Magazine, it is a structurally simple tragicomedy that recounts the conflict between a dull but sweet daughter and her brilliant, unemotional father. The plot of the novel is based upon a true story told to James by his close friend, British actress Fanny Kemble.[1] The book is often compared with Jane Austen's work for the clarity and grace of its prose and its intense focus on family relationships. James was not a great fan of Washington Square itself. He tried to read it over for inclusion in the New York Edition of his fiction (1907–1909) but found that he could not, and the novel was not included. Other readers, though, have sufficiently enjoyed the book to make it one of the more popular works of the Jamesian canon.
Read online

    The Portrait of a Lady — Volume 2

      Henry James / Romance & Love
The Portrait of a Lady — Volume 2

The Portrait of a Lady is a novel by Henry James, first published as a serial in The Atlantic Monthly and Macmillan's Magazine in 1880-1881 and then as a book in 1881. It is the story of a spirited young American woman, Isabel Archer, who "affronts her destiny" and finds it overwhelming. She inherits a large amount of money and subsequently becomes the victim of Machiavellian scheming by two American expatriates. Like many of James's novels, it is set mostly in Europe, notably England and Italy. Generally regarded as the masterpiece of his early phase of writing, this novel reflects James's absorbing interest in the differences between the New World and the Old. It also treats in a profound way the themes of personal freedom, responsibility, betrayal, and sexuality.
Read online

    The American

      Henry James / Romance & Love
The American

The American is Henry James' comic novel about an uncultured but well-meaning young businessman from the USA, who travels to Europe and is amazed by what he finds. An illustrative example of humor in the later part of the 19th century, The American is a character-driven story about a man of commerce named Christopher Newman. Tired of the stresses and strains native to business in the USA, Newman decides to travel to Europe to seek adventure. On arrival, the beauties and sins of the Old World are both a shock and a thrill to the traveller, who despite a mixed reception from the peoples of the European continent remains nevertheless optimistic and driven to discovery. The novel is generally lighthearted in portraying the naivete and optimism of Newman for comic effect. However, Henry James more serious undertone was to illustrate that Americans - despite their lack of refined mannerisms - are essentially an optimistic, honest and driven people with much to offer the wider world. Much of the book takes place in Paris, which James viewed as the quintessential centre of European culture. Having himself traversed Parisian society, James' accurate and sensual descriptions of the city and the upper reaches of its social strata are among the most praised parts of the novel. Despite the colourful style he imparted, James was unable to make The American a truly realistic story - a shortfall to which he confessed. Yet as a source of the era's humor and a romantic example of James' early style, The American is a book which shines.
Read online

    The Wings of the Dove, Volume 1 of 2

      Henry James / Romance & Love
The Wings of the Dove, Volume 1 of 2

This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.
Read online

    The Europeans

      Henry James / Humor
The Europeans

One of Henry James’ main themes was the interaction between the Old World and the New. Restless Baroness Eugenia Munster and her charming bohemian brother Felix are visiting their American cousins in Boston, New England. The effect these two extravagant characters have on their austere Puritan relations forms the substance of the book and is told in a series of scenes or‘sketches’. The author writes with subtly observed good humour which accelerates and escalates into higher comedy as Felix, the main protagonist, manipulates his cousin’s emotional affiliations.
Read online

    The Outcry

      Henry James / History & Fiction
The Outcry

To cover the gambling debts of his daughter Kitty Imber, the widowed Lord Theign is planning to sell his beautiful painting Duchess of Waterbridge by Sir Joshua Reynolds to American billionaire Breckenridge Bender. Hugh Crimble, a young art critic, argues against the sale, saying that Britain's art treasures should stay in the country. While the controversy in this novel might seem hopelessly remote and trivial, it's seemingly similar to the furor that erupted during the 1980s in the United States, when Japanese buyers were snapping up "trophy acquisitions" in America. American newspapers at the time created much the same stink as the British newspapers in James' book.
Read online