I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream

      Harlan Ellison
I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream

First published in 1967 and re-issued in 1983, I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream contains seven stories with copyrights ranging from 1958 through 1967. This edition contains the original introduction by Theodore Sturgeon and the original foreword by Harlan Ellison, along with a brief update comment by Ellison that was added in the 1983 edition. Among Ellison's more famous stories, two consistently noted as among his very best ever are the title story and the volume's concluding one, Pretty Maggie Moneyeyes.

Since Ellison himself strongly resists categorization of his work, we won't call them science fiction, or SF, or speculative fiction or horror or anything else except compelling reading experiences that are sui generis. They could only have been written by Harlan Ellison and they are incomparably original.

CONTENT
"I Have No Mouth & I Must Scream"
"Big Sam Was My Friend"
"Eyes of Dust"
"World of the Myth"
"Lonelyache"
"Delusion for Dragonslayer"
"Pretty Maggie Moneyeyes"


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    Over the Edge/An Edge in My Voice

      Harlan Ellison
Over the Edge/An Edge in My Voice

"Razor Sharp Beyond the Edge. Harlan Ellison's stories and essays have been on the cutting edge of contemporary American Literature for over 40 years, but he stubbornly refuses to abandon the use of a manual typewriter. He's involved in every medium from television drama to comic books, and his works have been translated into 26 languages. Although he's won more awards for his writing than any living fantasist, Harlan still refuses to eat lima beans. In May 1996, White Wolf announced what is still its most ambitious publishing program for a single author: the first 20 volumes of the collected fiction, essays, teleplays and columns of the writer whom The Washington Post calls ""one of the great living American short story writers"." The first volume of this series, containing An Edge in My Voice and Over the Edge, is now available in trade paperback. Both books have been completely revised, updated and expanded for the hardcover publication, and this trade edition has been re-edited as well".


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    Paingod and Other Delusions

      Harlan Ellison
Paingod and Other Delusions

Robert Heinlein says, ?This book is raw corn liquor ? you should serve a whiskbroom with each shot so the customer can brush the sawdust off after he gets up from the floor.? Perhaps a mooring cable might also be added as necessary equipment for reading these eight wonderful stories: They not only knock you down?they raise you to the stars. Passion is the keynote as you encounter the Harlequin and his nemesis, the dreaded Tictockman, in one of the most reprinted and widely taught stories in the English language; a pyretic who creates fire merely by willing it; the last surgeon in a world of robot physicians; a spaceship filled with hideous mutants rejected by the world that gave them birth. Touching and gentle and shocking stories from an incomparable master of impossible dreams and troubling truths.

Contents:

7 · New Introduction: Your Basic Crown of Thorns · in
19 · Spero Meliora · in
24 · Paingod · ss Fantastic Jun ’64
35 · “Repent, Harlequin!” Said the Ticktockman · ss Galaxy Dec ’65
49 · The Crackpots [Kyben] · nv If Jun ’56
89 · Sleeping Dogs · ss Analog Oct ’74
100 · Bright Eyes · ss Fantastic Apr ’65
112 · The Discarded [“The Abnormals”] · ss Fantastic Apr ’59
125 · Wanted in Surgery · nv If Aug ’57
156 · Deeper Than the Darkness · nv Infinity Science Fiction Apr ’57


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    Troublemakers: Stories by Harlan Ellison

      Harlan Ellison
Troublemakers: Stories by Harlan Ellison

In a career spanning more than 50 years, Harlan Ellison has written or edited 75 books, more than 1700 stories, essays, articles and newspaper columns, two dozen teleplays, and a dozen movies. Now, for the first time anywhere, Troublemakers presents a collection of Ellison's classic stories -- chosen by the author -- that will introduce new readers to a writer described by the New York Times as having "the spellbinding quality of a great nonstop talker, with a cultural warehouse for a mind."


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    Memos From Purgatory

      Harlan Ellison
Memos From Purgatory

Hemingway said, "A man should never write what he doesn't know." In the mid-fifties, Harlan Ellison--kicked out of college and hungry to write--went to New York to start his writing career. It was a time of street gangs, rumbles, kids with switchblades and zip guns made from car radio antennas. Ellison was barely out of his teens himself, but he took a phony name, moved into Brooklyn's dangerous Red Hook section and managed to con his way into a "bopping club." What he experienced (and the time he spent in jail as a result) was the basis for the violent story that Alfred Hitchcock filmed as the first of his hour-long TV dramas...This autobiography is a book whose message you won't be able to ignore or forget. "Harlan Ellison is the dark prince of American letters, cutting through our corrupted midnight fog with a switchblade prose. He simply must be read." --Pete Hamill "Ellison writes with sensitivity as well as guts--a rare combination." --Leslie Charteris, creator of The Saint


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    The Deadly Streets

      Harlan Ellison
The Deadly Streets

Remember Charles Bronson stalking the streets of New York blowing holes in muggers in Death Wish? Remember Glenn Ford standing off the vicious juvenile delinquents in Blackboard Jungle? Well, it is more than fifty years and two different worlds from 1955 to now. And something the author of these stories knows that you are scared to admit is that reality and fantasy have flip‑flopped. They have switched places. The stories that scare you today are the ones about rapists and thugs, psychos who will carve you for a dollar and hypes who will bust your head to get fixed. Glenn Ford’s world was yesterday, and Bronson’s is today. And in the stalking midnight of this book, one of America’s top writers, Harlan Ellison, invades the shadows of both!


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    Strange Wine

      Harlan Ellison
Strange Wine

Harlan Ellison's Deathbird Stories was selected by the American Library Association as one of the Best Books for Young Adults, 1975. School Library Journal said the same thing. This modern master of the macabre invites lovers of Poe, Kafka and Borges to a gourmet's sampling of the headiest wine since Montressor's Amontiillado. Strange Wine: the quaffing of deep drafts of imagination...unsettling visions by the man whom Pete Hamill called "the Dark Prince of American letters." Fifteen previously uncollected tales in which the Pied Piper of Hamelin is come again, this time to pipe the Apocalypse for humanity; the spirits of executed Nazi war criminals walk Manhattan streets; the damned soul of a Lizzie Borden-like murderess escapes from Hell; a horny young man is haunted by the ghost of his Yiddishe Momma; an amoral womanizer seeks his awful destiny among the derelicts and alligators living in the sewers beneath the city; gremlins write the fantasies of a gone-dry writer; the nephew of The Shadow wreaks terrible vengeance on the New York Literary Establishment; and the exquisite Dr. D'ArqueAngel injects her patients with immunizing doses of the distillate of death.


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    Harlan Ellison's Watching

      Harlan Ellison
Harlan Ellison's Watching

Everybody's entitled to his own opinion, right? WRONG!! He or she is entitled to an informed opinion-so if you don't like being argued with, if you don't like a tital stranger telling you that your opinion is stupid, and you're fulla crap, DO NOT BUY THIS BOOK! Because this guy never learned how to lie, and he is either adored or printed on hate posters in Cheney's office, Ku Klux Klan dens, schlock poroducers' bathrooms, and those idiot sites on the internet that truckle to ultra-maroons.


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    The Top of the Volcano: The Award-Winning Stories of Harlan Ellison

      Harlan Ellison
The Top of the Volcano: The Award-Winning Stories of Harlan Ellison

New, fresh, and different is tricky in the storytelling business, as rare as diamonds, but, as a born storyteller, Harlan made story brave, daring, surprising again, brought an edge of the gritty and the strange, the erudite and the street-smart, found ways to make words truly come alive again in an over-worded world.

From the watershed of the ’50s and ’60s when the world found its dynamic new identity, to a self-imitating, sadly all too derivative present, he has kept storytelling cool and hip, exhilarating, unexpected yet always vital, able to get under your skin and change your life.

And now we have it. The Top of the Volcano is the collection we hoped would come along eventually, twenty-three of Harlan’s very best stories, every one being award-winning, brought together in a single volume at last. There’s the unforgettable power of "Repent, Harlequin!" Said the Ticktockman, The Whimper of Whipped Dogs and Mefisto in Onyx, the heart-rending pathos of Jeffty Is Five and Paladin of the Lost Hour, the chilling terror of I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream, the ingenuity and startling intimacy of Adrift Just Off the Islets of Langerhans…

These stories are full of the light and life of someone with things worth saying and the skills to do it, presented in the book we had to have -- not just a Best-of (though given what’s on offer it may just fall out that way) but in one easy-to-grab volume perfect for newbies, long-time fans and seasoned professionals alike to remind them just how it can be done.


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    No Doors No Windows

      Harlan Ellison
No Doors No Windows

Harlan Ellison's suspense anthology: 15 stories and one wild, 32-page introduction. Some tales, such as "Toe the Line" and "Ormond Always Pays His Bills," are simple pulp crime yarns; others are masterful examples of psychological terror and, in the case of "Whipped Dogs," mystical fantasy. Excellent. Originally published in 1975.

Contents:

9 · Blood/Thoughts · in
41 · The Whimper of Whipped Dogs · ss Bad Moon Rising, ed. Thomas M. Disch, Harper & Row, 1973
61 · Eddie, You’re My Friend [as by Jay Solo] · ss The Saint Detective Magazine (UK) Mar ’65
67 · Status Quo at Troyden’s · ss The Saint Detective Magazine Nov ’58
81 · Nedra at f:5.6 [revised from “The Hungry One”] · ss Gent Feb ’57
91 · Opposites Attract [“Mad Bomber”] · ss Caper Nov ’57
103 · Toe the Line · ss The Saint Detective Magazine Jun ’57
113 · Down in the Dark [as by Ellis Hart] · ss Adam Bedside Reader #30 ’67
123 · Pride in the Profession · ss Adam Aug ’66
137 · The Children’s Hour [as by Wallace Edmondson] · ss Fantastic Universe Jul ’58
145 · White Trash Don’t Exist [“Murder Bait”] · ss Mantrap Oct ’56
159 · Thicker Than Blood · ss Mike Shayne Mystery Magazine Feb ’58
169 · Two Inches in Tomorrow’s Column [as by Ellis Hart] · ss Adam Bedside Reader #21 ’65
177 · Promises of Laughter · ss Adam Nov ’69
187 · Ormond Always Pays His Bills · ss Pursued Jul ’57
193 · The Man on the Juice Wagon [as by Cordwainer Bird] · ss Adam Bedside Reader #14 ’63
211 · Tired Old Man · ss Mike Shayne Mystery Magazine Jan ’76


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    The Harlan Ellison Hornbook / Harlan Ellison's Movie

      Harlan Ellison
The Harlan Ellison Hornbook / Harlan Ellison's Movie

We come now to Volume 3 of the ambitions Edgeworks program, in which White Wolf and its Borealis Legends imprint continue to release damned near every book ever written by Harlan Ellison. And this time, in yet another gigantic volume featuring two complete Ellison titles, we combine a major collection of his incomparable, troublemaking, uncompromising, confrontational essays, plus a foreword by award-winning author Robert Crais, with a rare, previously unavailable (except in a $100 very limited edition) publication of Harlan Ellison's Movie, the full-length feature film he created when a producer at 20th Century-Fox said to him, "If we gave you the money, and no interference, what sort of movie would you write?" Well, that producer is not only no longer at 20th, he left the whole entire venue of moviemaking after Harlan Ellison's Movie was seen by the Suits at the studio. There's no use even trying to describe what this film is about, except to confirm the long-standing rumor that it contains a scene in which a 70-foot-tall boll weevil chews and swallows an entire farmhouse and silo on camera. (It's Scene 33C.) What you might want to do, if you have a moment before carrying this swell book to the cash register up front, is to grab the book clerk who filed Edgeworks 3 in with the crappy Star Trek novelizations and all those dumb books with unicorns lifting their legs to pee golden on an elm tree, and say to that clerk, "You really ought to cross-file this lovely volume with Current Affairs or Pop Culture or Essays or Film of Books About Movies." Because if they've got it in a section that employs the letter "s" and "f"--well, that's just the behavior of zombies.


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    The City on the Edge of Forever: The Original Teleplay

      Harlan Ellison
The City on the Edge of Forever: The Original Teleplay

The controversy has raged for almost 30 years--now readers can judge for themselves. Harlan Ellison wrote the original award-winning teleplay for "The City on the Edge of Forever, " which was rewritten and became the most-loved Star Trek episode of all time. Ellison sued Paramount in protest and won. This book contains the teleplay and afterwords by Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, George Takei and others.


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    Can & Can'tankerous

      Harlan Ellison
Can & Can'tankerous

Harlan Ellison has been compared to an annoying gnat, a no-see ’em buzzing in your peripheral vision till you try to swat him, and he’s gone.

The great English writer Michael Moorcock—and if his name does not leave you dumbstruck with awe, you should move on—called Ellison a “fox in the sf hen-coop” whose presence will “produce a brighter, faster hen, with improved survival characteristics, laying a tastier, more nourishing egg” and went on to say Ellison was “a brave and lively little beast, who makes a great show of himself to the hounds, but remains too wary ever to lead them to his lair.”

The brilliant novelist Joanna Russ, in admiring frustration, opined that Ellison’s stories “have an assault on you,” but complained that “they’re not like a piece of sculpture that you can stop and walk around and look at from all sides.” Ellison’s reply: “Absolutely not; I want them to grab you by the throat and tear off parts of your body.”

Ellison’s a double agent who lures you into the bush, and when you blink, he’s gone; you don’t know whether to turn left or right, or just dig a hole. He crafts enigmas set to entrap you. When Ellison sees where a story is going, he figures—since he’s writing for the smartest readers alive—you do, too. So he stops and turns left. Or right. Or widdershins. Or digs a cave with 200 tunnels.

Can & Can’tankerous gathers ten previously uncollected tales from the fifth and sixth decades of Harlan Ellison’s professional writing career: a written-in-the-window endeavor that invites re-reading from the start before you’ve even finished it; a second entry in his (now) ongoing abcedarian sequence; a “lost” pulp tale re-cast as a retro-fable; a melancholy meditation for departed friend and fellow legend, Ray Bradbury; a 2001 revision of a 1956 original; an absurdist ascent toward enlightenment (or its gluten-free substitute); a 200-word exercise in not following the directions as written (with a special introduction by Neil Gaiman that weighs in at four times the word count of its subject); a fantastical lament for a bottom-line world; the 2011 Nebula Award-winning short story; and Ellison’s most recent offering, a fusion of fact and fiction that calls to mind Russ’s frustration and Moorcock’s metaphor while offering a solution to the story’s enigma in plain view.

Strokes be damned! Ellison’s still here! HE’s still writing! And with more new books published in the last ten years than any preceding decade of his career, his third act is proving to be the kind other living legends envy.


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    Gentleman Junkie and Other Stories of the Hung-Up Generation

      Harlan Ellison
Gentleman Junkie and Other Stories of the Hung-Up Generation

The original 50 cent paperback edition of this book now goes for $100 in rare book auctions. Why? Because it contains 25 of the best, hardest-to-find stories of the writer the Washington Post calls "one of the great living American short story writers," the unpredictable Harlan Ellison.

Bold and uncompromising, Gentleman Junkie and Other Stories of the Hung-up Generation is a watershed moment in Harlan Ellison’s early writing career. Rather than dealing in speculative fiction, these twenty-five short stories directly tackle issues of discrimination, injustice, bigotry, and oppression by the police. Pulling from his own experience, Ellison paints vivid portraits of the helpless and downtrodden, blazing forth with the kind of unblinking honesty that would define his career.

Contents

Foreword (Gentleman Junkie and Other Stories of the Hung-Up Generation) • (1961) • essay by Frank M. Robinson
Introduction: The Children of Nights • (1975) • essay
Final Shtick • (1960) • short story
Gentleman Junkie • (1961) • short story
May We Also Speak? • (1961) • essay
Daniel White for the Greater Good • (1961) • short story
Lady Bug, Lady Bug • (1961) • short story
Free with This Box! • (1958) • short story
There's One on Every Campus • (1959) • short story
At the Mountains of Blindness • (1961) • short story
This Is Jackie Spinning • (1959) • short story
No Game for Children • non-genre • (1959) • short story
The Late, Great Arnie Draper • (1961) • short story
High Dice • (1961) • short story
Enter the Fanatic, Stage Center • (1961) • short story
Someone Is Hungrier • (1960) • short story
Memory of a Muted Trumpet • non-genre • (1960) • short story
Turnpike • (1961) • short story
Sally in Our Alley • (1959) • short story
The Silence of Infidelity • non-genre • (1957) • short story
Have Coolth • (1959) • short story
RFD #2 • (1957) • short story by Harlan Ellison and Henry Slesar
No Fourth Commandment • (1956) • short story
The Night of Delicate Terrors • (1961) • short story


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