Bionic Punchline

      Damon L. Wakes
Bionic Punchline

What do a squeamish torturer, an intelligent zombie, a newspaper-phobic superhero and Genghis Khan have in common? They're all in this book, and their stories were all written for Flash Fiction Month 2014. With one story for each and every day of July--and a humourous analysis of the event--there's something for everyone here."I have no problem with this, nor any useful comments!" ~Jasper FfordeIt was the ultimate cold case. The murders occurred on Mars twenty years ago, so how can Detective Inspector Richardson, a local policeman from Melbourne, Australia, track down the murderer – and why is he being asked to?Twenty years ago, the Prometheus landed in the Hellas Basin on Mars and all the crew died from unknown causes. When an historic site survey crew arrive, they find that the circumstances of the deaths weird and inexplicable. Yet secret coded instructions from the UN space agency HQ on Earth indicates that these circumstances were somehow known in advance. This is murder and Detective Inspector Richardson, a local detective from Melbourne, is called in to solve the case. There are only four people with means and opportunity, all of them are highly focused, very intelligent and none of them, apparently, has a convincing motive. Richardson must sort out their stories to find the guilty, all the time wondering why he was given this job at all.Joseph H.J. Liaigh started out studying the polar ice caps on Mars. Since then he has worked as a government scientist, an Air Force intelligence officer and an academic. He has studied everything from the methane streams on Titan to the flat topped volcanoes of Venus. Through all this, he has been an avid devotee of detective fiction. In The Prometheus Incident, he brings these two worlds together in a unique way to create an unusual and intriguing mystery.

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    Red Herring

      Damon L. Wakes
Red Herring

Written one-a-day in July 2013, these thirty-one more very short stories feature a wide (and often surprising) cast of characters: a drunken angel, a baby-themed supervillain, a man who spontaneously turns into two mildly annoyed horses. This book is for everyone who's ever wondered: "Just what would happen if Hydrogen quit its day job to become a country music star...?"It's the end of the world as we know it, and the Eclective feels fine.The Shifting Sands by Tara West: When a jealous goddess threatens to destroy all of humanity, a young woman and her family must overcome impossible odds to survive.Light by Emma Jameson: In the zombie apocalypse, the hope for humanity's survival is pinned on Daniel. Unfortunately, Daniel is an android. And humanity may be past all hope...Alien Butt Plugs by PJ Jones: The aliens are coming! And Jeb's first line of defense may be worse than the anal probe he fears.Seeds by M. Edward McNally: For Meats and his fellow Guns, life was simple. Keep your respirator clear, your weapon ready, and an eye on your neighbors. Until one day Meats found some seeds, and everything got complicated.Cleavers by Heather Marie Adkins: Creatures such as the Cleavers should never exist. But in Tora's world, they're real, and death is more likely than survival.The Last Christmas by Alan Nayes: On the verge of the Apocalypse, a young couple wish to spend one last Christmas together.Combustion by RG Porter: Kate wakes to find her world scorched and survivors in short supply. She needs to unravel the cause before time runs out.

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    OCR is Not the Only Font

      Damon L. Wakes
OCR is Not the Only Font

Silly, surreal and sometimes serious, these thirty-one very short stories cover a vast range of subjects and themes. Written entirely during July 2012, these flash fiction pieces are accompanied by a deeply unscientific analysis of the challenge that spawned them: to write thirty-one stories in thirty-one days.Silly, surreal and sometimes serious, these thirty-one very short stories cover a vast range of subjects and themes. Written entirely during July 2012, these flash fiction pieces are accompanied by a deeply unscientific analysis of the challenge that spawned them: to write thirty-one stories in thirty-one days.From lovesick androids to disgruntled minotaurs, the stories in this book embrace Classical mythology, futuristic sci-fi, and a variety of other genres that would much rather have stayed out of the way. Within these electronic pages, you will find disgraced superheroes, unionised zombies, steam-powered clowns and incompetent astronauts. Includes a non-fiction section analysing the results of this month-long experiment.

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