Notable Quotes of Catcher McCall

      C.J. Lanet
Notable Quotes of Catcher McCall

The quotes entitled "Medal of Honor" and "Presidential Candidate of the United States" are from Part Two: Catcher McCall - Respect and Betrayal.Part One - Catcher McCall - Regrets and Rescue chronicled the events in Af-fucking-ghanistan, which culminates in inadvertently saving the life of a U.S. Congressman that warrants Catcher McCall to receive the Congressional Medal of Honor. Because of accepting the reluctant prize, the public's fascination catapults Catcher McCall to be a candidate for the presidency of the United States. What happened next is truer than fiction. As William Faulkner said, "The best fiction is far more true than any journalism."Part Two - I’m Catcher McCall: War hero, Congressional Medal of Honor recipient, and candidate for the presidency of the United States. Why and how it happened makes telling the truth a revolutionary act. Indeed, truth is not obligated to conform to possibilities, and instead changes with time and convention. Famous Catcher McCall quotes in the context of being a candidate for the presidency. Catcher McCall ... Outsider is presented as a modern day epic in three volumes: Catcher McCall - Regrets and Rescue, Catcher McCall - Respect and Betrayal and Catcher McCall - Lost and Return. Volume Four - Catcher McCall vs. Wall Street is scheduled for release on April 1, 2013.______________
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    Confessions of a Grasshopper

      C.J. Lanet
Confessions of a Grasshopper

An audacious kidnapping, a high-speed chase and dramatic rescue are well-traveled features of a run-of-the-mill screenplay, except that the kidnappee and the Grassalot colony are humanoid size, talking grasshoppers; the "hoppernappers" are a raunchy bunch of college kids; and the high speed chase stretches from New Mexico to New York City.DCI Barbara Black investigates the curious death of Adrian Mansfield, an artistic young man cast adrift in a boat on Amberton lake. He has been tied into a sitting position with an insulting sign hung about his neck. Murder is assumed, but Barbara's investigations take us into escalating family tragedy and Adrian's dark, antinatalist philosophy. No-one seems surprised that Adrian has died. He was, we learn, obsessed with his dead sister, a talented young writer, who took her own life a few years earlier. So, indeed, is Martha Bottomley, a retired social worker and friend of the family, who has, according to Barbara's sergeant, a morbid interest in the deaths of young people. Philosophical and thought-provoking detective fiction - a why rather than whodunnit.
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