Omega

      Bradley Stoke
Omega

Omega returns the adult reader to the world of childhood imagination: a world populated by the fantastic, the fabulous and the thoroughly improbable. But a world where adult concerns of poverty, injustice, prejudice, politics and economics are all too real. In this world, the reader is taken on a search for the Truth in a more literal sense than one would expect.Omega returns the adult reader to the world of childhood imagination: a world populated by the fantastic, the fabulous and the thoroughly improbable. But a world where adult concerns of poverty, injustice, prejudice, politics and economics are all too real. In this world, the reader is taken on a search for the Truth in a more literal sense than one would expect. On the way, the reader meets characters familiar to childhood who confront this question with different formulations and very different solutions.Independent Reviews:Absolutely outstanding and complex fable which stands comparison with Jonathan Swift. Our traveller meets religious absurdism head on. Highly recommended.A very superior fantasy this, set in a world full of different pockets of existence distinguished by species or class or faith. As a result, it’s layered and complex, and whilst slow moving it’s refreshingly unpredictable. The humour and targets are, I suppose, British, but there’s a general appeal. Don’t miss it is my recommendation.- Alaric McDermotI enjoyed reading this imaginative piece, which says a lot, because I confess I am not a fan of science fiction and my tastes are very limited with respect to what I'll read in the fantasy genre. I think it reads very smoothly and holds the reader's interest.- Native LawI confess that I might have been put off by giant, talking grasshoppers had they appeared in a first chapter. That’s a prejudice of mine, I think. It doesn’t apply here though. In the first place it’s so charmingly and well written. In the second place it suits your purpose very well (or you make it do so): a vehicle for commentary on social, political, religious, scientific and aesthetic issues. (Have I left anything out? It is a very broad canvass you’ve chosen.) The fantasy goes deeper than this, of course. The Cartesian and Newtonian divisions of the Church, for example, are intriguing, suggestive, actually quite plausible.I was rather taken with the quest. An excellent read.- Longden
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