Mistress of the Game

      Asabea Ashun
Mistress of the Game

Sarah Ankrah’s wedding to Phillip Arthur-Beck was a marriage of two cultures. Her Ghanaian family made sure it was loud and cheerful and his Canadian family made sure that it started on time! So far, they’ve lived through the challenges together, but there is one that just won’t go away. Only one person dares meet this challenge head on. And she’s only too willing to help…Mistress of the Game is about marriage of two cultures, African and Western that went wrong in the end becasue of betrayal of trust . It is also about the politics of new found oil in Ghana and the greed and dirty dealings that go with it. Mistress of the Game is also about courage, hope and survival in the face of despair and the shattering realisation of living with HIV/AIDS.The intrigue in the novel is hightened when Sarah, the Ghanaian young woman married to a Canadian, Philip, connives with her pushy and overbearing mother (who incidentally means well) to deceive Philip in the most bizarre and unscrupulous manner ever imagined; juxtaposed with this couple are Jason, Philip’s younger brother and Araba, a young Ghanaian girl who discovers that one of the ways to survive in a dying metropolis that now threatens to come alive through the oil boom and the influx of expatriates, technocrats and crooks alike all wanting to cash in on the ‘liquid gold’, is to make good use of her one major asset - her body. Ironically, it is Araba who with her two fatherless children of mixed race, give us hope at the end of the story.The language is rich with humour, laced with Ghanaian English and Akan akin to Ayikwei Parkes’ Tail of the Blue Bird. The main settings for the plot are Takoradi, in Ghana, and Canada. The writer expounds well researched history and facts that gives credence to her academic background. The descriptions of scenes and planes are so vivid that the reader keeps ohing and ahing in recognition of familiar sights and landmarks. The Ghanaian characters are real, with everyday expressions and attiitudes that spell out the ingredients that make the Ghanaian that happy, go lucky human being, easily able to shrug off problems with that matter of fact approach to life, albeit full of humour.

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