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The firebird and other r.., p.1
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       The Firebird and Other Russian Fairy Tales, p.1

           Arthur Ransome
 
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The Firebird and Other Russian Fairy Tales


  Copyright

  Text copyright © 1995, 2004 by Dover Publications, Inc.

  Illustrations copyright © 1995 by Simon Galkin

  All rights reserved.

  Bibliographical Note

  The Firebird and Other Russian Fairy Tales, first published by Dover Publications, Inc. in 2004, reprints, in slightly edited form, nine stories from Old Peter’s Russian Tales, originally published by T. C. and E. C. Jack, Ltd., London, in 1916.

  Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

  Ransome, Arthur, 1884–1967.

  The Firebird and other Russian fairy tales / Arthur Ransome ; illustrated by Simon Galkin.

  p. cm.

  “Reprints, in slightly edited form, nine stories from Old Peter’s Russian tales, originally published by T.C. and E.C. Jack, Ltd., London, in 1916”—T.p. verso.

  Contents: Sadko—Frost—The three men of power—Baba Yaga—The little daughter of the snow—The golden fish—Alenoushka and her brother—Prince Ivan—The Firebird, the Horse of Power, and the Princess Vasilissa.

  9780486146638

  1. Fairy tales—Russia. [1. Fairy tales. 2. Folklore—Russia.] I. Galkin, Simon, ill. II. Ransome, Arthur, 1884–1967. Old Peter’s Russian tales. III. Title.

  PZ8.R174Fi 2004

  398.2’0947—dc22

  2004056120

  Manufactured in the United States of America

  Dover Publications, Inc., 31 East 2nd Street, Mineola, N.Y. 11501

  Note

  These nine classic fairy tales transported children’s imaginations in old Russia, and still do so today. They are filled with magic beasts, daring young men, beautiful maidens, wicked witches and, as might be expected, lots of snow.

  In one of the most famous of these tales we are introduced to Baba Yaga, a fearsome witch whose legs are just bone and who has metal jaws and drives a mortar and pestle through the woods. Not surprisingly, she likes to eat children. On the other hand, she can also underestimate their cleverness. The composer Moussorgsky devoted one section of his Pictures at an Exhibition to Baba Yaga.

  In another tale we catch sight of the magnificent firebird, whose feathers are made of gold. Rising at dawn, it sheds golden light over the forest as it flies. The glorious beauty of a single feather from the firebird changes forever the life of a young archer. The archer also rides a magic horse called a “horse of power” who can gallop mightily and give very good advice. Stravinsky’s ballet The Firebird is based on this story.

  The other Russian classics in this book include “Sadko” and “The Little Daughter of the Snow” (Rimsky-Korsakov wrote operas based on both of these), as well as “Frost,” “Prince Ivan,” “The Golden Fish,” “The Three Men of Power,” and “Alenoushka and Her Brother.”

  The author, Arthur Michell Ransome, lived from 1884 to 1967, and traveled from his native England to Russia, China and Egypt, among other places, collecting folk and fairy tales for his many children’s books.

  Table of Contents

  Title Page

  Copyright Page

  Note

  Sadko

  Frost

  The Three Men of Power

  Baba Yaga

  The Little Daughter of the Snow

  The Golden Fish

  Alenoushka and Her Brother

  Prince Ivan

  The Firebird, the Horse of Power, and the Princess Vasilissa

  Sadko

  IN NOVGOROD in the old days there was a young man—just a boy he was—the son of a rich merchant who had lost all his money and died. So Sadko was very poor. He had not a kopeck in the world, except what the people gave him when he played his dulcimer for their dancing. He had blue eyes and curling hair, and he was strong, and would have been merry; but it is dull work playing for other folk to dance, and Sadko dared not dance with any young girl, for he had no money to marry on, and he did not want to be chased away as a beggar. And the young women of Novgorod, they never looked at the handsome Sadko. No; they smiled with their bright eyes at the young men who danced with them, and if they ever spoke to Sadko, it was just to tell him sharply to keep the music going or to play faster.

  So Sadko lived alone with his dulcimer, and made do with half a loaf when he could not get a whole, and with crust when he had no crumb. He did not mind so very much what came to him, so long as he could play his dulcimer and walk along the banks of the little river Volkhov that flows by Novgorod, or on the shores of the lake, making music for himself, and seeing the pale mists rise over the water, and dawn or sunset across the shining river.

  “There is no girl in all Novgorod as pretty as my little river,” he used to say, and night after night he would sit by the banks of the river or on the shores of the lake, playing the dulcimer and singing to himself.

  Sometimes he helped the fishermen on the lake, and they would give him a little fish for his supper in payment for his strong young arms.

  And it happened that one evening the fishermen asked him to watch their nets for them on the shore, while they went off to take their fish to sell them in the square at Novgorod.

  Sadko sat on the shore, on a rock, and played his dulcimer and sang. Very sweetly he sang of the fair lake and the lovely river—the little river that he thought prettier than all the girls of Novgorod. And while he was singing he saw a whirlpool in the lake, little waves flying from it across the water, and in the middle a hollow down into the water. And in the hollow he saw the head of a great man with blue hair and a gold crown. He knew that the huge man was the Tzar of the Sea. And the man came nearer, walking up out of the depths of the lake—a huge, great man, a very giant, with blue hair falling to his waist over his broad shoulders. The little waves ran from him in all directions as he came striding up out of the water.

  Sadko did not know whether to run or stay; but the Tzar of the Sea called out to him in a great voice like wind and water in a storm,—

  “Sadko of Novgorod, you have played and sung many days by the side of this lake and on the banks of the little river Volkhov. My daughters love your music, and it has pleased me too. Throw out a net into the water, and draw it in, and the waters will pay you for your singing. And if you are satisfied with the payment, you must come and play to us down in the green palace of the sea.”

  With that the Tzar of the Sea went down again into the waters of the lake. The waves closed over him with a roar, and presently the lake was as smooth and calm as it had ever been.

  Sadko thought, and said to himself: “Well, there is no harm done in casting out a net.” So he threw a net out into the lake.

  He sat down again and played on his dulcimer and sang, and when he had finished his singing the dusk had fallen and the moon shone over the lake. He put down his dulcimer and took hold of the ropes of the net, and began to draw it up out of the silver water. Easily the ropes came, and the net, dripping and glittering in the moonlight.

  “I was dreaming,” said Sadko; “I was asleep when I saw the Tzar of the Sea, and there is nothing in the net at all.”

  And then, just as the last of the net was coming ashore, he saw something in it, square and dark. He dragged it out, and found it was a coffer. He opened the coffer, and it was full of precious stones—green, red, gold—gleaming in the light of the moon. Diamonds shone there like little bundles of sharp knives.

  “There can be no harm in taking these stones,” says Sadko, “whether I dreamed or not.”

  He took the coffer on his shoulder, and bent under the weight of it, strong though he was. He put it in a safe place. All night he sat and watched by the nets, and played and sang, and planned what he would do.

  In the morning the f
ishermen came, laughing and merry after their night in Novgorod, and they gave him a little fish for watching their nets; and he made a fire on the shore, and cooked it and ate it as he used to do.

  “And that is my last meal as a poor man,” says Sadko. “Ah me! who knows if I shall be happier?”

  Then he set the coffer on his shoulder and tramped away for Novgorod.

  “Who is that?” they asked at the gates.

  “Only Sadko the dulcimer player,” he replied.

  “Turned porter?” said they.

  “One trade is as good as another,” said Sadko, and he walked into the city. He sold a few of the stones, two at a time, and with what he got for them he set up a booth in the market. Small things led to great, and he was soon one of the richest traders in Novgorod.

  And now there was not a girl in the town who could look too sweetly at Sadko. “He has golden hair,” says one. “Blue eyes like the sea,” says another. “He could lift the world on his shoulders,” says a third. A little money, you see, opens everybody’s eyes.

  But Sadko was not changed by his good fortune. Still he walked and played by the little river Volkhov. When work was done and the traders gone, Sadko would take his dulcimer and play and sing on the banks of the river. And still he said, “There is no girl in all Novgorod as pretty as my little river.” Every time he came back from his long voyages—for he was trading far and near, like the greatest of merchants—he went at once to the banks of the river to see how his sweetheart fared. And always he brought some little present for her and threw it into the waves.

  For twelve years he lived unmarried in Novgorod, and every year made voyages, buying and selling, and always growing richer and richer. Many were the mothers in Novgorod who would have liked to see him married to their daughters. Many were the pillows that were wet with the tears of the young girls, as they thought of the blue eyes of Sadko and his golden hair.

  And then, in the twelfth year since he walked into Novgorod with the coffer on his shoulder, he was sailing in a ship on the Caspian Sea, far, far away. For many days the ship sailed on, and Sadko sat on deck and played his dulcimer and sang of Novgorod and of the little river Volkhov that flows under the walls of the town. Blue was the Caspian Sea, and the waves were like furrows in a field, long lines of white under the steady wind, while the sails swelled and the ship shot over the water.

  And suddenly the ship stopped.

  In the middle of the sea, far from land, the ship stopped and trembled in the waves, as if she were held by a big hand.

  “We are aground!” cry the sailors; and the captain, the great one, tells them to take soundings. Seventy fathoms by the bow it was, and seventy fathoms by the stern.

  “We are not aground,” says the captain, “unless there is a rock sticking up like a needle in the middle of the Caspian Sea!”

  “There is magic in this,” say the sailors.

  “Hoist more sail,” says the captain; and up go the white sails, selling out in the wind, while the masts bend and creak. But still the ship lay shivering and did not move, out there in the middle of the sea.

  “Hoist more sail yet,” says the captain; and up go the white sails, swelling and tugging, while the masts creak and groan. But still the ship lay there shivering and did not move.

  “There is an unlucky one aboard,” says an old sailor. “We must draw lots and find him, and throw him overboard into the sea.”

  The other sailors agreed to this. And still Sadko sat, and played his dulcimer and sang.

  The sailors cut pieces of string, all of a length, as many as there were souls in the ship, and one of those strings they cut in half. Then they made them into a bundle, and each man plucked one string. And Sadko stopped his playing for a moment to pluck a string, and his was the string that had been cut in half.

  “Magician, sorcerer, unclean one!” shouted the sailors.

  “Not so,” said Sadko. “I remember now an old promise I made, and I keep it willingly.”

  He took his dulcimer in his hand, and leapt from the ship into the blue Caspian Sea. The waves had scarcely closed over his head before the ship shot forward again, and flew over the waves like a swan’s feather, and came in the end safely to her harbour.

  Sadko dropped into the waves, and the waves closed over him. Down he sank, like a pebble thrown into a pool, down and down. First the water was blue, then green, and strange fish with goggle eyes and golden fins swam round him as he sank. He came at last to the bottom of the sea.

  And there, on the bottom of the sea, was a palace built of green wood. Yes, all the timbers of all the ships that have been wrecked in all the seas of the world are in that palace, and they are all green, and cunningly fitted together, so that the palace is worth a ten days’ journey only to see it. And in front of the palace Sadko saw two big kobbly sturgeons, each a hundred and fifty feet long, lashing their tails and guarding the gates. Now, sturgeons are the oldest of all fish, and these were the oldest of all sturgeons.

  Sadko walked between the sturgeons and through the gates of the palace. Inside there was a great hall, and the Tzar of the Sea lay resting in the hall, with his gold crown on his head and his blue hair floating round him in the water, and his great body covered with scales lying along the hall. The Tzar of the Sea filled the hall—and there is room in that hall for a village. And there were fish swimming this way and that in and out of the windows.

  “Ah, Sadko,” says the Tzar of the Sea, “you took what the sea gave you, but you have been a long time in coming to sing in the palaces of the sea. Twelve years I have lain here waiting for you.”

  “Great Tzar, forgive,” says Sadko.

  “Sing now,” says the Tzar of the Sea, and his voice was like the beating of waves.

  And Sadko played on his dulcimer and sang.

  He sang of Novgorod and of the little river Volkhov which he loved. It was in his song that none of the girls of Novgorod were as pretty as the little river. And there was the sound of wind over the lake in his song, the sound of ripples under the prow of a boat, the sound of ripples on the shore, the sound of the river flowing past the tall reeds, the whispering sound of the river at night. And all the time he played cunningly on the dulcimer. The girls of Novgorod had never danced to so sweet a tune when in the old days Sadko played his dulcimer to earn kopecks and crusts of bread.

  Never had the Tzar of the Sea heard such music.

  “I would dance,” said the Tzar of the Sea, and he stood up like a tall tree in the hall.

  “Play on,” said the Tzar of the Sea, and he strode through the gates. The sturgeons guarding the gates stirred the water with their tails.

  And if the Tzar of the Sea was huge in the hall, he was huger still when he stood outside on the bottom of the sea. He grew taller and taller, towering like a mountain. His feet were like small hills. His blue hair hung down to his waist, and he was covered with green scales. And he began to dance on the bottom of the sea.

  Great was that dancing. The sea boiled, and ships went down. The waves rolled as big as houses. The sea overflowed its shores, and whole towns were under water as the Tzar danced mightily on the bottom of the sea. Hither and thither rushed the waves, and the very earth shook at the dancing of that tremendous Tzar.

  He danced till he was tired, and then he came back to the palace of green wood, and passed the sturgeons, and shrank into himself and came through the gates into the hall, where Sadko still played on his dulcimer and sang.

  “You have played well and given me pleasure,” says the Tzar of the Sea. “I have thirty daughters, and you shall choose one and marry her, and be a Prince of the Sea.”

  He began to dance on the bottom of the sea.

  “Better than all maidens I love my little river,” says Sadko; and the Tzar of the Sea laughed and threw his head back, with his blue hair floating all over the hall.

  And then there came in the thirty daughters of the Tzar of the Sea. Beautiful they were, lovely, and graceful; but twenty-nine of th
em passed by, and Sadko fingered his dulcimer and thought of his little river.

  There came in the thirtieth, and Sadko cried out aloud. “Here is the only maiden in the world as pretty as my little river!” says he. And she looked at him with eyes that shone like stars reflected in the river. Her hair was dark, like the river at night. She laughed, and her voice was like the flowing of the river.

  “And what is the name of your little river?” says the Tzar.

  “It is the little river Volkhov that flows by Novgorod,” says Sadko; “but your daughter is as fair as the little river, and I would gladly marry her if she will have me.”

  “It is a strange thing,” says the Tzar, “but Volkhov is the name of my youngest daughter.”

  He put Sadko’s hand in the hand of his youngest daughter, and they kissed each other. And as they kissed, Sadko saw a necklace round her neck, and knew it for one he had thrown into the river as a present for his sweetheart.

  She smiled, and “Come!” says she, and took him away to a palace of her own, and showed him a coffer; and in that coffer were bracelets and rings and earrings—all the gifts that he had thrown into the river.

  And Sadko laughed for joy, and kissed the youngest daughter of the Tzar of the Sea, and she kissed him back.

  “O my little river!” says he; “there is no girl in all the world but thou as pretty as my little river.”

  Well, they were married, and the Tzar of the Sea laughed at the wedding feast till the palace shook and the fish swam off in all directions.

  And after the feast Sadko and his bride went off together to her palace. And before they slept she kissed him very tenderly, and she said,—

  “O Sadko, you will not forget me? You will play to me sometimes, and sing?”

  “I shall never lose sight of you, my pretty one,” says he; “and as for music, I will sing and play all the day long.”

 
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