D day the battle for nor.., p.67
Larger Font   Reset Font Size   Smaller Font       Night Mode Off   Night Mode

       D-Day: The Battle for Normandy, p.67
 

           Antony Beevor

  p. 290 ‘more like jungle fighting’, NA II 407/427/24206

  358th Infantry, Lieutenant George W.Godfrey, 90thDivision,NA II 407/427/24240 p. 291 ‘The population has to evacuate . . .’, Obergefreiter Hans S., 17 July, 9.Kp./ Gren.Rgt.1058, 91.(LL.)Inf.Div., BfZ-SS

  German artillery observation officer dressed as a priest, Lieutenant James J. Williams, 47th Infantry, 9th Division, NA II 407/427/24241

  ‘The men said they held . . .’, Lieutenant James J. Williams, 47th Infantry, 9th Division, NA II 407/427/24241

  p. 292 ‘poker and mint juleps . . .’, diary of Captain Thomas P. Jacobs, MD, 45th Armored Medical Battalion, 3rd Armored Division, WWII VS

  ‘Sunday punch’, NA II 407/427/24232

  ‘a tall Britisher . . .’, Forrest C. Pogue, Pogue’s War, Lexington, Kentucky, 2001, p. 130

  ‘two preachers . . .’, Blumenson (ed.), p. 481

  p. 293 Artillery airbursts, 331st Infantry, 83rd Division, NA II 407/427/24203

  ‘I remember one poignant . . .’, James H. Watts, Chemical Battalion, NWWIIM-EC

  ‘Then, he shot . . .’, Captain Elmer G. Koehler, Battalion surgeon, 12th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division, NA II 407/427/ 24242

  ‘I saw medical aid men . . .’, Captain William Pola, Medical Detachment, 66th Armored Regiment, 2nd Armored Division, NA II 407/427/24242

  p. 294 ‘I got so I can tell . . .’, Captain William L. Johnston, 100th Evacuation Hospital, NA II 407/427/24240

  ‘It’s such a paradox . . .’, George Silverton, Chief of X Ray Department, 2nd Evacuation Hospital, MdC TE 710

  ‘blooded’, diary of Captain Thomas P. Jacobs, MD, 45th Armored Medical Battalion, 3rd Armored Division, WWII VS p. 295 K-Rations, WWII VS

  ‘I find it a bit hard . . .’, diary of Captain Jack H. Welch, 54th Armored Medical, 3rd Armored Division, WWII VS

  sergeant in 1st Infantry Division, Sergeant Leroy N. Stewart, 26th Infantry Regiment, WWII VS

  ‘French kids . . .’, Vernon W. Tart, 618th Ordinance Ammunition Company, NWWIIM-EC

  p. 296 ‘I know we lack . . .’, J. Le Gal, ‘Un Gendarme à Caumont l’Eventé’, MdC TE 398

  30th Division casualties, NA II 407/427/ 24232 p. 297 ‘I remember going up . . .’, Bradley Holbrook, NWWIIM-EC

  p. 298 ‘Fix bayonets! Twenty-nine, let’s go!’, NA II 407/427/24232

  p. 300 ‘like a sled’ and ‘known simply as “Chief”’, NA II 407/427/24232 p. 302 29th Division, night of 15 July, NA II 407/427/24232

  Interview Colonel Godwin Ordway Jr, Commanding Officer, 115th Infantry, 20 July, NA II 407/427/24034 p. 303 ‘Cota was hit...’, Lieutenant Edward G. Jones, Cavalry Reconnaissance Troop, 29th Infantry Division, WWII VS

  25th Cavalry Squadron, Lieutenant Edward G. Jones, Cavalry Reconnaissance Troop, 29th Infantry Division, WWII VS

  p. 304 ‘the magnificent American troops . . .’, Montgomery tribute, NA II 407/427/24232

  19

  OPERATION GOODWOOD

  p. 306 ‘I am viewing the prospects . . .’, 14 July, PDDE, p. 2004

  ‘I came upon a line . . .’, Brigadier M. J. P. O’Cock, 2nd Battalion Irish Guards, SWWEC 2003.2287

  p. 307 ‘alternate thrusts’, Stephen A. Hart, Montgomery and ‘Colossal Cracks’, Westport, Conn., 2000, p. 103

  Crocodile tanks, Kriegstagebuch Panzer Group West/Fifth Panzer Army, BA-MA MSg 2/4831

  ‘There is a nice cool breeze . . .’, Captain S. Beck, MdC TE 570

  9th SS Panzer-Division Hohenstaufen, General Sylvester Stadler, FMS B-470

  ‘the whole length . . .’, Eberhard Beck, 277th Artillerie-Regiment, 277th Infanterie-Division, BA-MA MSg 2/3242

  p. 309 277th Infanterie-Division, Heeresgruppe B, BA-MA RH 19 ix/86

  ‘decisive for the course of the war . . .’, XL 2287, quoted in Ralph Bennett, Ultra in the West, New York: 1979, p. 106

  ‘out of the question’, Heeresgruppe B, BA-MA RH 19 ix/86 ‘The units will fight . . .’, Kurt Meyer,

  Grenadiers, Mechanicsburg, Pa., 2005, p. 270

  p. 310 Frenchwoman at Sainte-Foy-de-Montgommery, Simone Grieux-Isabelle, MdC TE 419

  ‘that the Panzer Group . . .’, Kriegstagebuch Panzer Group West/Fifth Panzer Army, BA-MA MSg 2/4831

  p. 311 Operations Goodwood and Atlantic, NA II 407/427/24200

  ‘pre-recorded wireless traffic’, A. D. E. Curtis, R Force, SWWEC 2000.384

  ‘We’ll be moving into top gear!’, N. F. Burrell, 1/7th Queens, 131st Infantry Brigade, 7th Armoured Division, SWWEC LEEWW 2004.2680

  ‘We are undoubtedly . . .’, diary of Major Julius Neave, 13th/18th Hussars, SWWEC T2150

  p. 313 ‘a bit of mistletoe . . .’, quoted in Laurence Whistler, The Laughter and the Urn: The Life of Rex Whistler, London, 1985, p. 287

  Tedder and Coningham on Goodwood, Air Publication 3235, Air Ministry, 1955, p. 151, AHB

  p. 314 RAF report on Goodwood bombing, Air Support, Air Publication 3235, Air Ministry, 1955, AHB

  p. 315 ‘like cars crawling . . .’, Whistler, p. 289

  p. 316 ‘Prisoners are streaming in . . .’, Major Peter Griffin, 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion, NAC/ANC R5067-0-0-E

  ‘a breakthrough appeared unavoidable’, Eberbach, Panzer Group West, FMS B-840

  ‘completely overrun’ and ‘Some tanks had received direct hits . . .’, Heeresgruppe B, BA-MA RH 19 ix/86

  ‘At 10.00 hours . . .’, Eberbach, BA-MA MSg 1/106

  ‘Suddenly a Sherman . . .’, W. H. Close, 3rd Royal Tank Regiment, SWWEC 2002.1713

  p. 317 ‘What happened was incomprehensible . . .’, Eberbach, BA-MA MSg 1/106

  p. 318 ‘death ride’, Alexander McKee, Caen: Anvil of Victory, London, 1965, p. 263

  five Tiger tanks and eight Mark IVs, Generalleutnant Edgar Feuchtinger, FMS B-441

  ‘no more reserves’, Heeresgruppe B, BA-MA RH 19 ix/86; and Kriegstagebuch Panzer Group West, BA-MA MSg 2/4831

  1st SS Panzer-Division at Ifs-Bras, Heeresgruppe B, BA-MA RH 19 ix/86 p. 319 ‘Operations this morning . . .’, quoted in L. F. Ellis, Victory in the West, London, 1962, Vol. I, pp. 344-5

  ‘like children’, Brigadier E. T. Williams, G-2, 21st Army Group, OCMH-FPP

  ‘We were fighting . . .’, Eberbach, Panzer Group West, FMS B-840

  p. 320 ‘The enemy needed only . . .’, Eberbach, BA-MA MSg 1/106

  Hitler Jugend tank losses to fighter-bombers, Tagesmeldungen, Heeresgruppe B, BA-MA RH 19 ix/86

  ‘the British continued to stay immobile . . .’, Eberbach, Panzer Group West, FMS B-840

  ‘found him in grand form . . .’, 19 July, Field Marshal Lord Alanbrooke, War Diaries 1939-1945, London, 2001, p. 571

  p. 321 ‘Russian style’ breakthrough and press conferences, Lieutenant Colonel Kraminov, MdC TE 246

  ‘a field strewn . . .’, N. F. Burrell, 1/7th Queens, SWWEC LEEWW 2004.2680

  p. 322 ‘There comes a time . . .’, Bill Close, A View from the Turret, Tewkesbury, 1998, p. 130

  ‘Either it was just gross . . .’, diary of Major Julius Neave, 13th/18th Hussars, SWWEC T2150

  ‘It rained and there were mosquitoes . . .’, Rev. Jim Wisewell, 223rd Field Ambulance, 3rd Infantry Division, SWWEC T1141

  British and Canadian losses in Normandy, TNA WO 171/139

  p. 323 army complaints about the lack of bombs on Bourguébus ridge, Air Support, Air Publication 3235, Air Ministry, 1955, p. 158, AHB

  ‘General Montgomery was reminded . . .’, Royal Air Force Narrative, Vol. III, p. 81, AHB; and 2nd TAF Operations Report by Air Marshal Sir Arthur Coningham, TNA AIR 20/1593

  ‘a national decline in boldness and initiative’, LHCMA Liddell Hart 11/ 1944/45

  p. 324 ‘But once the needle . . .’, Brigadier Sir Ian Fraser, MdC TE 160

  ‘One boy of about sixteen . . .’, John Colville, The Fringes of Power, London, 1985, p. 474

  20

  THE PLOT AGAINST HITLER

  p. 326 ‘inflexible mission of defending . . .’, Generalleutnan
t Hans Speidel, FMS B-721

  ‘The Führer must be killed . . .’, TNA WO 208/4363

  ‘and above all about . . .’, Hans Speidel, We Defended Normandy, London, 1951, p. 132

  ‘a hardline anti-semite’, Richard J. Evans, The Third Reich at War, London, 2008,p. 379

  ‘measures to be taken immediately . . .’, Generalleutnant Hans Speidel, FMS B-721 p. 327 ‘oasis’ for the Resistance, Wilhelm Ritter von Schramm, BA-MA MSg 2/247

  for an excellent analysis of the Allies and the German opposition to Hitler, see Michael Howard, Liberation or Catastrophe?, London, 2007, pp. 80-93

  p. 329 move of Führer headquarters on 14 July to Wolfsschanze, General Warlimont, ETHINT 5

  I must request you . . .’, Generalleutnant Hans Speidel, FMS B-721

  ‘We are experiencing the overwhelming . . .’, Eberbach, BA-MA MSg 1/1079

  p. 330 ‘The longer Hitler . . .’, 21st Army Group Intelligence Summary, 23 April 1944, TNA WO 205/532 (2)

  ‘The Chiefs of Staff . . .’, Ismay to Churchill, 21 June, TNA HS 6/623

  Operation Foxley, TNA HS 6/624, and Mark Seaman (ed.), Operation Foxley, Kew, 1998

  Churchill’s views on Hitler and unconditional surrender, TNA HS 6/625; and Churchill’s speech in House of Commons 2 August 1944

  p. 331 ‘Since the generals have . . .’, quoted in Ian Kershaw, Hitler: 1936- 1945, Nemesis, London, 2000, p. 656

  p. 332 ‘strikingly large briefcase’, General Warlimont, ETHINT 5

  British fuses used in bomb, M. R. D., Foot, SOE in France, London, 1966, p. 331 n5

  p. 333 ‘over a million foreign workers . . .’, Otto Remer, Commander Guard Regiment Grossdeutschland, ETHINT 63

  p. 334 ‘Gestapo riot’, Blumentritt, FMS B-284

  ‘executive powers had been passed . . .’, Otto Remer, Commander Guard Regiment Grossdeutschland, ETHINT 63

  ‘What do you know about the situation?’, Otto Remer, Commander Guard Regiment Grossdeutschland, ETHINT 63

  p. 335 ‘The Führer is dead . . .’, quoted in Ralph Bennett, Ultra in the West, New York, 1979, p. 110

  ‘Today at midday . . .’, 20.40 hours, 20 July, Tagesmeldungen, Heeresgruppe B, BA-MA RH 19 ix/86

  p. 336 ‘Unterweltsmarschall’, Blumentritt, FMS B-284

  Dietrich and Himmler, Eberbach, BA-MA MSg 1/1079

  ‘almost turned revolutionary’, Eberbach, TNA WO 208/4363, quoted in Sönke Neitzel (ed.), Tapping Hitler’s Generals, St Paul, Mn, 2007, p. 101

  ‘In my opinion . . .’, TNA WO 208/4363 p. 337 ‘Long live holy Germany!’, quoted in Kershaw, p. 683

  Kluge’s order to arrest Stülpnagel, BA-MA RH19 ix/86

  ‘the Military Commander . . .’, BA-MA RH19 ix/86

  ‘came like a bomb-shell’, Generalleutnant Bodo Zimmermann, OB West, FMS B-308

  ‘it spread like wild-fire . . .’, Hans Höller, 21st Panzer-Division, MdC TE 98

  ‘the front kept on fighting . . .’, Generalleutnant Bodo Zimmermann, OB West, FMS B-308

  ‘indignation and anger’, Eberbach, 23 December tape, TNA WO 208/4364

  ‘Our signaller heard . . .’, Eberhard Beck, 277th Artillerie Regiment, 277th Infanterie-Division, BA-MA MSg 2/3242

  p. 338 ‘feeling of moral oppression . . .’, Generalleutnant Bodo Zimmermann, OB West, FMS B-308

  ‘might well be the proverbial . . .’, Duff Hart-Davis (ed.), King’s Counsellor, London, 2006, p. 245

  ‘Explanation of Continued German Resistance’, 8 September 1944, LHCMA Alanbrooke 6/1/5

  p. 339 ‘an idiotic idea’, Wilhelm Ritter von Schramm, BA-MA MSg 2/247

  ‘falsification of the enemy situation’, Hubert Meyer, The 12th SS, Vol. I, Mechanicsburg Pa., 2005, p. 36

  ‘daily reports which even . . .’, General Bülowius, II Flieger Corps, FMS B-620

  p. 340 ‘had a really good relationship . . .’, Günter Peuckert, 272th Infanterie-Division, BA-MA MSg 2/5424

  ‘malgré-nous’, Nicolas Fank, 116th Panzer-Division, MdC TE 531

  ‘No, no. I play no tricks . . .’, Aitken, Medical Officer, 24th Lancers, WLHUM RAMC 1668

  p. 341 ‘If somebody betrays . . .’, 1944, BA-MA RH 21-5/50, quoted in Peter Lieb, Konventioneller Krieg oder Weltanschauungskrieg? , Munich, 2007, p. 439

  US Army report on German prisoners in Normandy, NA II 407/427/24242

  ‘Kameradenerziehung’, Eugène Finance, MdC TE 331

  21

  OPERATION COBRA - BREAKTHROUGH

  p. 342 German radio intercepts, Oberstleutnant Ziegelmann, 352nd Infanterie-Division, FMS B-455

  ‘One unit surrendered . . .’, NA II 407/ 427/24242

  ‘a battalion of the 90th . . .’, Martin Blumenson (ed.), The Patton Papers, 1940- 1945, New York, 1974, p. 486

  p. 343 ‘War is about 90% waiting . . .’, diary of Captain Jack H. Welch, 54th Armored Medical, 3rd Armored Division, WWII VS

  p. 345 ‘The observershung around . . .’, 4th Infantry Division, NA II 407/427/6431

  ‘thepeculiarrustlinginthesky’, 4thInfantry Division, NA II 407/427/6431

  bombing casualties on 24 July, NA II 407/ 427/24245

  ‘The flamboyant, red-headed...’, Colonel Kraminov, MdC TE 246

  ‘stiffened perceptibly’, Forrest C. Pogue, Pogue’s War, Lexington, Kentucky, 2001, pp. 167-8

  p. 346 Soviet complaint about reports of former Red Army soldiers fighting for the Germans, see Eisenhower letters 26 and 27 July, PDDE, pp. 2031 and 2032

  ‘Fourteenth US Army’, TNA HW 40/6

  accident with bayonets, Robert B. Bradley, 120th Infantry Regiment, 30th Infantry Division, MdC TE 366

  p. 347 ‘the faces of the dead . . .’, Robert B. Bradley, MdC TE 366

  ‘Many of them only . . .’, NA II 407/427/ 24245

  ‘all men and officers who were under the bombing . . .’, NA II 407/427/6431

  p. 348 Kluge and Operation Spring, Oberstgruppenführer Paul Hausser, Seventh Army, ETHINT 48

  ‘The whole place . . .’, Generalleutnant Fritz Bayerlein, Panzer Lehr Division, ETHINT 66

  transfer of German panzer divisions to American sector, Omar Bradley, A Soldier’s Story, New York, 1951, p. 341

  ‘the drawing off of German panzers . . .’, Colonel Thomas Bigland, liaison officer with First US Army, then 12th Army Group, SWWEC 99-10

  Panzer Lehr losses, ETHINT 66, then FMS A-903

  p. 349 ‘many of . . .’, diary of Captain Jack H. Welch, 54th Armored Medical, 3rd Armored Division, WWII VS

  ‘At the end of this great bombing . . .’, NA II 407/427/24242

  ‘The rest huddled in a corner . . .’, Lieutenant Clyde Eddinger, 4th Infantry Division, NA II 407/427/24021

  ‘The resultfor the firstday . . .’, 4th Infantry Division, NA II 407/427/24021

  p. 350 ‘The effectiveness of the bombardment . . .’, 4th Infantry Division, NA II 407/ 427/6431

  ‘quite a collection . . .’, Lieutenant Donald Dickinson, Company B, 22nd Infantry, 4th Infantry Division, NA II 407/427/24021

  p. 351 ‘a lot of looting’, Lieutenant John B. Derden, 66th Armored Regiment, WWII VS

  ‘The number of kill-lusty people . . .’, Captain Jim R. Burt, 66th Armored Regiment, 2nd Armored Division, WWII VS

  ‘Private De Castro . . .,’ E Company, 22nd Infantry, NA II 407/427/24021

  p. 352 Montreuil-sur-Lozon, Brigadier General Doyle O. Hickey, Combat Command A, 3rd Armored Division, NA II 407/ 427/24088

  ‘overhead like hawks...’, General Schmidt, 275th Infanterie-Division, FMS A-973

  ‘friendly tanks’ and ‘an old soldier . . .’, NA II 407/427/6431

  ‘We were riding along . . .’, Lieutenant George O. Grant, 69th Tank Battalion, 6th Armored Division, NA II 407/427/24241

  p. 353 ‘good clothes’, Blumenson (ed.), p. 489

  ‘I tell you one thing, Sani . . .’, SanUffz Walter Klein, Kampfgruppe Heintz, FMS A-910

  p. 354 Browning and air drop on Avranches, Wing Commander Scarman, Tedder’s aide
, OCMH-FPP

  ‘Felt much happier over the war . . .’, Blumenson (ed.), p. 490

  ‘Because of heavy losses . . .’, TNA DEFE 3/ 63

  ‘a rather confused situation’, General der Panzertruppen Freiherr von Lüttwitz, 2nd Panzer-Division, FMS A-903

  ‘the din of shell-fire . . .’, General Eugen Meindl, II Parachute Corps, FMS A-923

  p. 355 ‘from staff to staff . . .’, General Eugen Meindl, II Parachute Corps, FMS A-923

  p. 356 ‘just rushed on through’, Lieutenant George O. Grant, 69th Tank Battalion, 6th Armored Division, NA II 407/427/24241

  Collins’s criticism of 3rd Armored Division, NA II 407/427/24235

  p. 357 6th Armored Division on 28 July, 69th Tank Battalion, 6th Armored Division, NA II 407/427/24241

  ‘no forces fit for battle’ and ‘neither light nor medium . . .’, 28 July, TNA DEFE 3/ 63

  ‘used to fire point-blank . . .’, VII Corps, NA II 407/427/24235

  ‘For five days . . .’, SanUffz Walter Klein, Kampfgruppe Heintz, FMS A-910

  ‘when other elements . . .’, Lieutenant James J. Williams, 47th Infantry, 9th Division, NA II 407/427/24241

  tension between SS and paratroops, Oberstleutnant Friedrich Freiherr von der Heydte, 6th Paratroop Regiment, FMS B-839

  p. 358 the sacking of Generalmajor Pemsel, Generalmajor Freiherr von Gersdorff, Chief of Staff Seventh Army, FMS A-894

  p. 359 ‘on the road all night’ and ‘that they did it . . .’, 4th Infantry Division, NA II 407/ 427/6431

  ‘a knocked out enemy vehicle standing . . .’, NA II 407/427/24021

  ‘only one-way traffic . . .’, Major William A. Castille, Combat Command B, 3rd Armored Division, NA II 407/427/24088

  ‘Hell,within acoupleof days . . .’,William M. King, 44th Armored Infantry Battalion, 6th Armored Division, NA II 407/427/ 24241

  ‘they crapped in them and cooked in them’, Captain Thomas P. Jacobs, MD, 45th Armored Medical Battalion, 3rd Armored Division, WWII VS

  2nd Panzer-Division on 29 July, General der Panzertruppen Freiherr von Lüttwitz, FMS A-903

  p. 360 Captain Reid and Private Sharkey, 22nd Infantry, 4th Infantry Division, NA II 407/427/24021

  p. 361 Moyon engagement, Combat Command Rose, NA II 407/427/24021

  82nd Reconnaissance Battalion, Major Willis T. Smith, 67th Armored Regiment, 2nd Armored Division, NA II 407/427/ 24242

 
Turn Navi Off
Turn Navi On
Scroll Up
Scroll
Add comment

Add comment