Judas

      Amos Oz
Judas

Winner of the International Literature Prize, the new novel by Amos Oz is his first full-length work since the best-selling A Tale of Love and Darkness.
Jerusalem, 1959. Shmuel Ash, a biblical scholar, is adrift in his young life when he finds work as a caregiver for a brilliant but cantankerous old man named Gershom Wald. There is, however, a third, mysterious presence in his new home. Atalia Abarbanel, the daughter of a deceased Zionist leader, a beautiful woman in her forties, entrances young Shmuel even as she keeps him at a distance. Piece by piece, the old Jerusalem stone house, haunted by tragic history and now home to the three misfits and their intricate relationship, reveals its secrets.

At once an exquisite love story and coming-of-age novel, an allegory for the state of Israel and for the biblical tale from which it draws its title, Judas is Amos Oz's most powerful novel in decades.


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    Rhyming Life and Death

      Amos Oz
Rhyming Life and Death

An unnamed author waits in a bar in Tel Aviv on a stifling hot night. He is there to give a reading of his work but as he sits, bored, he begins to conjure up the life stories of the people he meets. Later, when the reading is done he asks a woman for a drink. She declines and the author walks away, only to climb the steps to her flat, later that night. Or does he?

In Amos Oz's beguiling, intriguing story the reader never really knows where reality ends and invention begins...


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    Suddenly in the Depths of the Forest

      Amos Oz
Suddenly in the Depths of the Forest

In a gray and gloomy village, all of the animals—from dogs and cats to fish and snails—disappeared years before. No one talks about it and no one knows why, though everyone agrees that the village has been cursed. But when two children see a fish—a tiny one and just for a second—they become determined to unravel the mystery of where the animals have gone. And so they travel into the depths of the forest with that mission in mind, terrified and hopeful about what they may encounter.

From the internationally bestselling author Amos Oz, this is a hauntingly beautiful fable for both children and adults about tolerance, loneliness, denial, and remembrance.


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    Where the Jackals Howl

      Amos Oz
Where the Jackals Howl

Oz's first book—beautifully repackaged— is a disturbing and moving collection of short stories about kibbutz life.

   Each of the eight stories in this volume grips the reader from the first line. Each conveys the tension and intensity of feeling during the founding period of Israel, a brand-new state with an age-old history.

   Some are love stories, more are hate stories, and frequently the two urges intertwine.


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    My Michael

      Amos Oz
My Michael

One of Amos Oz's earliest and most famous novels, My Michael created a sensation upon its initial publication in 1968 and established Oz as a writer of international acclaim. Like all great books, it has an enduring power to surprise and mesmerize.

Set in 1950s Jerusalem, My Michael tells the story of a remote and intense woman named Hannah Gonen and her marriage to a decent but unremarkable man named Michael. As the years pass and Hannah's tempestuous fantasy life encroaches upon reality, she feels increasingly estranged from him and the marriage gradually disintegrates.

Gorgeously written and profoundly moving, this extraordinary novel is at once a haunting love story and a rich, reflective portrait of place.


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    Between Friends

      Amos Oz
Between Friends

"Oz lifts the veil on kibbutz existence without palaver. His pinpoint descriptions are pared to perfection . . . His people twitch with life." — Scotsman

In Between Friends, Amos Oz returns to the kibbutz of the late 1950s, the time and place where his writing began. These eight interconnected stories, set in the fictitious Kibbutz Yekhat, draw masterly profiles of idealistic men and women enduring personal hardships in the shadow of one of the greatest collective dreams of the twentieth century.

A devoted father who fails to challenge his daughter's lover, an old friend, a man his own age; an elderly gardener who carries on his shoulders the sorrows of the world; a woman writing poignant letters to her husband's mistress—amid this motley group of people, a man named Martin attempts to teach everyone Esperanto.

Each of these stories is a luminous human and literary study; together they offer an eloquent portrait of an idea and of a charged...


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    The Hill of Evil Counsel

      Amos Oz
The Hill of Evil Counsel

"Sensuous prose and indelible imagery." — New York Times Three stories in which history and imagination intertwine to re-create the world of Jerusalem during the last days of the British Mandate. Refugees drawn to Jerusalem in search of safety are confronted by activists relentlessly preparing for an uprising, oblivious to the risks. Meanwhile, a wife abandons her husband, and a dying man longs for his departed lover. Among these characters lives a boy named Uri, a friend and confidant of several conspirators who love and humor him as he weaves in and out of all three stories. The Hill of Evil Counsel is "as complex, vivid, and uncompromising as Jerusalem itself" (Nation).


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    Soumchi

      Amos Oz
Soumchi

When Soumchi, an eleven-year-old boy growing up in British-occupied Jerusalem just after World War II, receives a bicycle as a gift from his Uncle Zemach, he is overjoyed—even if it is a girl's bicycle. Ignoring the taunts of other boys in his neighborhood, he dreams of riding far away from them, out of the city and across the desert, toward the heart of Africa. But first he wants to show his new prize to his friend Aldo.

   In the tradition of such memorable characters as Huckleberry Finn and Holden Caulfield, Amos Oz's Soumchi is fresh, funny, and always engaging.


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    Black Box

      Amos Oz
Black Box

Seven years after their divorce, Ilana breaks the bitter silence with a letter to Alex, a world-renowned authority on fanaticism, begging for help with their rebellious adolescent son, Boaz. One letter leads to another, and so evolves a correspondence between Ilana and Alex, Alex and Michel (Ilana's Moroccan husband), Alex and his Mephistophelian Jerusalem lawyer—a correspondence between mother and father, stepfather and stepson, father and son, each pleading his or her own case.

The grasping, lyrical, manipulative, loving Ilana has stirred things up. Now, her former husband and her present husband have become rivals not only for her loyalty but for her son's as well.


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    Don't Call It Night

      Amos Oz
Don't Call It Night

A New York Times Notable Book of the Year

"A rich symphony of humanity . . . If Oz's eye for detail is enviable, it is his magnanimity which raises him to the first rank of world authors." —Sunday Telegraph (UK)

At Tel-Kedar, a settlement in the Negev desert, the longtime love affair between Theo, a sixty-year-old civil engineer, and Noa, a young schoolteacher, is slowly disintegrating. When a pupil dies under difficult circumstances, the couple and the entire town are thrown into turmoil. Amos Oz explores with brilliant insight the possibilities—and limits—of love and tolerance.

"Vivid, convincing, and haunting." —New York Times Book Review


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    Fima

      Amos Oz
Fima

From Publishers Weekly

The Israeli author's stirring chronicle of one man's emotional disintegration delves into basic issues of Jewish history.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

In Oz's new novel (after To Know a Woman , LJ 2/1/91), brilliant, pathetic, naive, dyspeptic Efraim (Fima) Nisan wanders through his Jerusalem life like an irritating shopper in a department store. Fima published a highly regarded book of poems in his salad days but has since lapsed into a dreary existence of intellectual and political quarreling; his brilliance gets on everyone's nerves almost as much as his inability to manage his life properly. He now works as a receptionist at a gynecological clinic and has puzzling affairs with women whose husbands have lost interest in them. Throughout the book, Fima makes plans to see a Jean Gabin film, but when he finally gets to the theater, it has come and gone. Oz uses his protagonist's arguments and fantasies of becoming prime minister to convey the confused and confusing mixture of political and personal life in his homeland. A fine work by one of Israel's best writers.
- Harold Augenbraum, Mercantile Lib., New York
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc.


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    Scenes from Village Life

      Amos Oz
Scenes from Village Life

A portrait of a fictional village, by one of the world's most admired writers In the village of Tel Ilan, something is off kilter. An elderly man complains to his daughter that he hears the sound of digging under his house at night. Could it be his tenant, a young Arab? But then the tenant hears the mysterious digging sounds too. The mayor receives a note from his wife: "Don't worry about me." He looks all over, no sign of her. The veneer of new wealth around the village—gourmet restaurants and art galleries, a winery—cannot conceal abandoned outbuildings, disused air raid shelters, rusting farm tools, and trucks left wherever they stopped. Amos Oz's novel-in-stories is a brilliant, unsettling glimpse of what goes on beneath the surface of everyday life. Scenes from Village Life is a parable for Israel, and for all of us.


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    The Same Sea

      Amos Oz
The Same Sea

The Same Sea is Amos Oz's most adventurous and inventive novel, the book by which he would like to be remembered. The cast of characters ranges from a prodigal son to a widowed father who has taken in his son's enticing young girlfriend, who in turn sleeps with her boyfriend's close friend. The author himself receives phone calls from his characters, criticizing the way he portrays them in his novel. In this human profusion there is chaos and order, love and eroticism, loyalty and betrayal, and ultimately an extraordinary energy.

"I wrote this book with everything I have. Language, music, structure—everything that I have. . . . This is the closest book I've written. Close to me, close to what I always wanted. . . . I went as far as I could."—Amos Oz


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